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Camcorders are used in the production of low-budget TV shows if the production crew does not have access to more expensive equipment. Movies have been shot entirely on consumer camcorder equipment (such as The Blair Witch Project, 28 Days Later and Paranormal Activity). Academic filmmaking programs have also switched from 16mm film to digital video in early 2010s, due to the reduced expense and ease of editing of digital media and the increasing scarcity of film stock and equipment. Some camcorder manufacturers cater to this market; Canon and Panasonic support 24p (24 fps, progressive scan—the same frame rate as cinema film) video in some high-end models for easy film conversion.
Regarding audio setup, I’ve Zoom H4N, Shure SM7B, EV RE-20, Heil PR-40, so shall I use something else? or connect one of this microphone to preamp? or video would be better if I am using shotgun microphone or clip/neck microphone?
Professional video cameras, such as those used in television production and sometimes filmmaking in digital cinema; these may be studio-based or mobile in the case of an electronic field production (EFP). Such cameras generally offer extremely fine-grained manual control for the camera operator, often to the exclusion of automated operation.
The earliest video cameras were those of John Logie Baird, based on the mechanical Nipkow disk and used in experimental broadcasts through the 1918s-1930s. All-electronic designs based on the video camera tube, such as Vladimir Zworykin’s Iconoscope and Philo Farnsworth’s image dissector, supplanted the Baird system by the 1930s. These remained in wide use until the 1980s, when cameras based on solid-state image sensors such as CCDs (and later CMOS active pixel sensors) eliminated common problems with tube technologies such as image burn-in and made digital video workflow practical. The transition to digital TV gave a boost to digital video cameras and by the 2010s, most video cameras were digital.
Price. Price is an important point to consider when choosing a DSLR because your camera body isn’t the only thing you will need to buy. Along with lenses you may also want to purchase things like filters, bags, cleaning supplies, and a tripod. This can add up quickly! Be sure to leave some room in your budget for accessories.
Most modern smartphones only have a menu choice to start a camera application program and an on-screen button to activate the shutter.[3] Some also have a separate camera button, for quickness and convenience. A few camera phones are designed to resemble separate low-end digital compact cameras in appearance and to some degree in features and picture quality, and are branded as both mobile phones and cameras.
Currently have a Panasonic TM900 for my low-light video needs. Use it primarily when I go to concerts and want to record the whole concert straight through. Connect it to the external recorder, which I mount on the camcorder itself. The whole contraption is on a monopod, which I hold up. I get quite a good workout haha
Combo-cameras combine full-feature still cameras and camcorders in a single unit. The Sanyo Xacti HD1 was the first such unit, combining the features of a 5.1 megapixel still camera with a 720p video recorder with improved handling and utility. Canon and Sony have introduced camcorders with still-photo performance approaching that of a digicam, and Panasonic has introduced a DSLR body with video features approaching that of a camcorder. Hitachi has introduced the DZHV 584E/EW, with 1080p resolution and a touch screen.
Some of these image-editing techniques are built into more sophisticated digital cameras. You might have a camera that has an optical zoom and a digital zoom. An optical zoom means that the lens moves in and out to make the incoming image bigger or smaller when it hits the CCD. A digital zoom means that the microchip inside the camera blows up the incoming image without actually moving the lens. So, just like moving closer to a TV set, the image degrades in quality. In short, optical zooms make images bigger and just as clear, but digital zooms make images bigger and more blurred.
The Leaf shutter or more precisely the in-lens shutter is a shutter contained within the lens structure, often close to the diaphragm consisting of a number of metal leaves which are maintained under spring tension and which are opened and then closed when the shutter is released. The exposure time is determined by the interval between opening and closing. In this shutter design, the whole film frame is exposed at one time. This makes flash synchronisation much simpler as the flash only needs to fire once the shutter is fully open. Disadvantages of such shutters are their inability to reliably produce very fast shutter speeds ( faster than 1/500th second or so) and the additional cost and weight of having to include a shutter mechanism for every lens.
Discover a whole new perspective by taking pictures and video with a drone. Many drones come equipped with a factory-installed camera, and are instantly ready to fly by remote control and collect images. Other drones have a mount for an action camera, which gives you more versatility with both devices. Some drones even offer first-person view, which allows you to use your smartphone or tablet as a remote control, and see a real-time video feed as you fly the drone.
I’m looking for a good/high quality video camera that is easy to setup and run let it run the whole day capturing a course or workshop that I am teaching – usually no additional lighting except some daylight and mostly just standard hotel conference room lights.
Kit lens. One of the ways to cut down the cost of a DSLR setup is to look for a “kit” which will come with a lens and body. This can be a great way to save money when you’re first getting started. While many kit lenses (with some notable exceptions) are fairly low level, they are a cost-effective way for beginning photographers to get their gear at a good price — and if you decide to upgrade to better lenses you can always sell your kit lens down the road.
The rear-mounted LCD screen on a digital camera allows users to see their photos and videos immediately after they have been taken, rather than a standard camera whose film needs to be developed. This screen can also make it easier to frame your pictures.
At the opposite end of the spectrum to some of the full-frame DSLRs here, the D3400 is cheap as chips, has one of the sharpest APS-C sensors there is and a neat retracting kit lens. It’s proof that you don’t have to pay a fortune to get a great camera, and we say its sheer value for money makes it just as impressive as much more advanced (and much more expensive) alternatives. It has a great 24MP sensor and although the controls are designed to be simple for novices, in the right hands the little D3400 is a match for cameras costing far more. A great DSLR for the first-time user. 
When you want to take a photograph with a film camera, you have to press a button. This operates a mechanism called the shutter, which makes a hole (the aperture) open briefly at the front of the camera, allowing light to enter through the lens (a thick piece of glass or plastic mounted on the front). The light causes reactions to take place in the chemicals on the film, thus storing the picture in front of you.
How rugged are these? Could the Canon work for a smart 7 year old who wants “to make movies?” The kids camcorders I have looked at seem to be, well, toys – – with a lot of serious deficiencies. Thanks
In a digital camera, exactly the opposite happens. Light from the thing you are photographing zooms into the camera lens. This incoming “picture” hits the image sensor chip, which breaks it up into millions of pixels. The sensor measures the color and brightness of each pixel and stores it as a number. Your digital photograph is effectively an enormously long string of numbers describing the exact details of each pixel it contains. You can read more about how an image sensor produces a digital picture in our article on webcams.
The Zoom Q8 isn’t something that we’ve looked into, as it’s way more specialized than what most of our readers need. That said, we trust the folks at Tested.com, and they had some pretty nice things about it
Actually, I really don’t need that feature, and I reckon I’d be paying for it if I went with the v850. Someone told me to go with the v850 anyway, because it’s a newer series than the v700 series (even though the v850 has been out there longer than the v770). Any truth to that? I just really don’t want to regret my choice.
I’d rather get rid of the camera icon (but keep the APP), since the icon is redundant of the camera icon that pulls up from the bottom of the screen. I know I can bury it in a folder, but “hide” would be a nice feature.
Thank you! That is exactly what i wanted to know, but couldn’t find. With the Panasonic, is the video high enough res that it will look ok if projected? Really i just put videos together for fun, but I do love trying new technology and having it look good! I looked at some of the higher end cameras, but didn’t know if this hobby is worth it to spend that much money on one. : )
When darkness falls, video cameras get scared. Low-light situations means that they have to make the most of every photon, sucking in as much light as possible and amplifying the signal from their image sensors to make it brighter—which can add an ugly speckling pattern to the footage.
We aren’t the only ones who rated the Panasonic as a top pick. Reviewed.com gave the Panasonic HC-W850 (which is identical to the HC-V770K but from last year with a second, rear-facing camera that lets you record your own face while you shoot normally through the front camera) a rating of 9.1 out of 10, putting it in third place in their camcorder chart.
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Not surprisingly, I find bridge models to be just about perfect for globetrotters. They pack a wide zoom range, so you don’t have to fumble with lens changes. And if you opt for a premium 1-inch model you can shoot in varying types of light. But you may want a different kind of camera to take with you on your journeys.
The introduction of films enabled the existing designs for plate cameras to be made much smaller and for the base-plate to be hinged so that it could be folded up compressing the bellows. These designs were very compact and small models were dubbed vest pocket cameras. Folding rollfilm cameras were preceded by folding plate cameras, more compact than other designs.
But wait! “Megapixels” are a misleading marketing ploy: what really matters is the size and quality of the image sensors themselves. Generally, the bigger the sensor, the better the pictures. Comparing the raw technical data, the Canon Ixus claims a 1/2.5″ CCD while the LG has a 1/3.06″ CMOS (a newer, somewhat different type of sensor chip). What do those numbers actually mean? Sensor measurements are based on needlessly confusing math that I’m not going to explain here, and you’ll have take it on trust that both of these cameras have tiny sensors, about half the size of a pinkie nail (measuring less than 5mm in each direction), though the Canon sensor is significantly bigger. The Digital Ixus, though eight years older than the LG smartphone, and with apparently half as many “megapixels,” has a significantly bigger sensor chip and one that’s likely to outperform the LG, especially in lower light conditions.
It seems that there is a way around this, though: if you use the USB to power adapter that comes with the camcorder along with a big USB battery, you can get longer battery life. Some AVForum users have been experimenting with this here: https://www.avforums.com/threads/panasonic-v750-batteries.1870074/
There are also premium bridge models with larger 1-inch sensors and shorter zooms. They still have a considerable size advantage over SLRs with comparable zooms—just think about carryin an interchangebale lens camera and two or three lenses to cover a 24-200mm, 24-400mm, or 24-600mm coverage range. They tend to be more expensive than an SLR, and certainly more than bridge models with smaller sensors, but do better at higher ISO settings and sport lenses that gather more light. If you put a premium on a lightweight camera, and want the versatility that a long zoom design delivers, look at a bridge model with a 1-inch sensor. Just be prepared to pay a premium.
Sensor: Full-frame CMOS | Megapixels: 30.4MP | Autofocus: 61-point AF, 41 cross-type | Screen type: 3.2-inch touchscreen, 1,620,000 dots | Maximum continuous shooting speed: 7fps | Movies: 4K | User level: Expert
Panasonic launched DVCPRO HD in 2000, expanding the DV codec to support high definition (HD). The format was intended for professional camcorders, and used full-size DVCPRO cassettes. In 2003 Sony, JVC, Canon and Sharp introduced HDV as the first affordable HD video format, due to its use of inexpensive MiniDV cassettes.
You may not think that you’ll be doing a lot of nighttime shooting, but it doesn’t take much of a dip in light levels for low-light performance to become important. Recording a birthday party at night, indoors? Or a family dinner? Off trick or treating? Or the ubiquitous school play? In all these cases, you need a video camera that will still deliver smooth motion and clean footage, where you can see all the details of what’s going on around you.
Pro photographers are almost always shooting Canon or Nikon SLR systems, but there are some very capable alternatives out there. There are reasons that you see most working photographers using one of the two most popular systems—they include a solid bevy of pro-grade bodies and lenses, a strong support system backing that equipment, and the comfort that years of use brings. That’s not to say you can’t go another way. Sony makes a pro-level SLR and a few mirrorless cameras that fit the bill.
Many early professional SLR cameras, such as the Kodak DCS series, were developed from 35 mm film cameras. The technology of the time, however, meant that rather than being digital “backs” the bodies of these cameras were mounted on large, bulky digital units, often bigger than the camera portion itself. These were factory built cameras, however, not aftermarket conversions.