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Thanks for the reply. it didn’t solve my problem in the way I had hoped! So I’ll try to rephrase my question in case that helps in getting me a clearer indication of what I might best do. Here goes: Are the alternative products you are looking at so clearly better in terms of price and product specs. that even someone in a hurry aught really to wait till you’ve finished your evaluation?
Nearly all camera phones use CMOS image sensors, due to largely reduced power consumption compared to CCD type cameras, which are also used, but in few camera phones. Some of camera phones even use more expensive Backside Illuminated CMOS which uses energy lesser than CMOS, although more expensive than CMOS and CCD.
But there are others too. I often recommend the small Canon G9 X, a relatively inexpensive 1-inch pocket model that offers palpable benefits over a smartphone in terms of image quality, and a comfortable touch interface. The Nikon D3400, with its easy-to-use Guide Mode is one of our favorite low-cost SLRs, and the Canon EOS M100 does a lot of things right in the mirrorless world.
This market has followed an evolutionary path driven by miniaturization and cost reduction enabled by progress in design and manufacture. Miniaturization reduces the imager’s ability to gather light; designers have balanced improvements in sensor sensitivity with size reduction, shrinking the camera imager and optics while maintaining relatively noise-free video in daylight. Indoor or dim-light shooting is generally noisy, and in such conditions artificial lighting is recommended. Mechanical controls cannot shrink below a certain size, and manual camera operation has given way to camera-controlled automation for every shooting parameter (including focus, aperture, shutter speed and color balance). The few models with manual override are menu-driven. Outputs include USB 2.0, Composite and S-Video and IEEE 1394/Firewire (for MiniDV models).
In bright sun, the quality difference between a good compact camera and a digital SLR is minimal but bridge cameras are more portable, cost less and have a greater zoom ability. Thus a bridge camera may better suit outdoor daytime activities, except when seeking professional-quality photos.[26]
Type: High-end compact | Sensor: APS-C CMOS | Resolution: 24.3MP | Lens: 23mm f/2 | Screen type: 3-inch, 1,040,000 dots | Viewfinder: Hybrid | Maximum continuous shooting speed: 8fps | Movies: 1080p | User level: Expert
Sensor: Full-frame CMOS | Megapixels: 45.4MP | Autofocus: 153-point AF, 99 cross-type | Screen type: 3.2-inch tilt-angle touchscreen, 2,359,000 dots | Maximum continuous shooting speed: 7fps | Movies: 4K | User level: Expert
Thanks so much for posting your two comments, I almost followed the recommendation here and bought the 770 and would have been sorely disappointed. I really like most of the reviews on The Wirecutter and The Sweethome but this article doesn’t meet their usual standards and doesn’t take into account how most people who would buy these products would actually use them. It would be great to see the authors go back and revise this in order to add a little more relevant data about file formats used.
A rangefinder is a device to measure subject distance, with the intent to adjust the focus of a camera’s objective lens accordingly (open-loop controller). The rangefinder and lens focusing mechanism may or may not be coupled. In common parlance, the term “rangefinder camera” is interpreted very narrowly to denote manual-focus cameras with a visually-read out optical rangefinder based on parallax. Most digital cameras achieve focus through analysis of the image captured by the objective lens and distance estimation, if it is provided at all, is only a byproduct of the focusing process (closed-loop controller).
Panasonic’s small but mighty Lumix GH4 mirrorless camera is designed for people who want to take both beautiful photos and high quality 4K video. With a flip out screen, built-in image stabilization, and 49 autofocus points, this thing can handle pretty much anything a vlogger throws its way. This is ideal for lifestyle vloggers who want superior optical quality in a portable package.
The frames are later played back in a ciné projector at a specific speed, called the “frame rate” (number of frames per second). While viewing, a person’s eyes and brain merge the separate pictures to create the illusion of motion. The first ciné camera was built around 1888 and by 1890 several types were being manufactured. The standard film size for ciné cameras was quickly established as 35mm film and this remained in use until transition to digital cinematography. Other professional standard formats include 70 mm film and 16mm film whilst amateurs film makers used 9.5 mm film, 8mm film or Standard 8 and Super 8 before the move into digital format.
In 2010, in Ireland the annual “RTÉ 60 second short award” was won by 15-year-old Laura Gaynor, who made her winning cartoon,”Piece of Cake” on her Sony Ericsson C510 camera phone.[34][35][36] In 2012, Director/writer Eddie Brown Jr,[37] made the reality thriller Camera Phone[38] which is one of the first commercial produced movies using camera phones as the story’s prospective. The film is a reenactment of an actual case and they changed the names to protect those involved. Some modern camera phones (in 2013-2014) have big sensors, thus allowing a street photographer or any other kind of photographer to take photos of similar quality to a semi-pro camera.
Currently have a Panasonic TM900 for my low-light video needs. Use it primarily when I go to concerts and want to record the whole concert straight through. Connect it to the external recorder, which I mount on the camcorder itself. The whole contraption is on a monopod, which I hold up. I get quite a good workout haha
Linescan cameras are also extensively used in imaging from satellites (see push broom scanner). In this case the row of sensors is perpendicular to the direction of satellite motion. Linescan cameras are widely used in scanners. In this case, the camera moves horizontally.
I’ve made some more samples including high speed camera movement, and I have to say the AVCHD 1080/50i looks better than MP4 720/25p in those movements. AVCHD 1080/50i has very fluid motion on the Popcorn Hour C200, it looks really nice.
Sensor: APS-C CMOS | Megapixels: 24.2MP | Lens mount: Canon EF-S | Screen: 3-inch articulating touchscreen, 1,040,000 dots | Continuous shooting speed: 5fps | Max video resolution: 1080p | User level: Beginner
Our final camera is a ‘bridge’ camera, a type of camera that we don’t normally like very much because the ultra-zoom design forces the makers to use titchy 1/2.3-inch sensors the same size as those in point-and-shoot cameras. You get the look and feel of a DSLR, but you certainly don’t get the image quality. But the Panasonic Lumix FZ2000 (known as the FZ2500 in the US) is different. It sacrifices a huge zoom range in favour of a much larger 1.0-inch sensor – a compromise most serious photographers will applaud. While the zoom tops out at 480mm equivalent, which is relatively short for a bridge camera, that’s still plenty for all but the most extreme everyday use. We’d certainly sacrifice a little for of zoom range for better and faster optics. We love the FZ2000 because it delivers both image quality and zoom range, while also offering full manual and semi-manual controls, the ability to shoot raw files and 4K video.
More recent devices capable of recording video are camera phones and digital cameras primarily intended for still pictures; the term “camcorder” may be used to describe a portable, self-contained device, with video capture and recording its primary function, often having advanced functions over more common cameras.
After some discussion, we focused on models that did not include built-in memory. Although built-in memory does have some advantages (it offer lots of capacity, and you can add even more with an SD card), it is more expensive than going without and just recording straight to SD card. We also removed models that had gimmicky extra features, like shooting in two directions at once.
Imagine for a moment that you’re a CCD or CMOS image sensing chip. Look out of a window and try to figure out how you would store details of the view you can see. First, you’d have to divide the image into a grid of squares. So you’d need to draw an imaginary grid on top of the window. Next, you’d have to measure the color and brightness of each pixel in the grid. Finally, you’d have to write all these measurements down as numbers. If you measured the color and brightness for six million pixels and wrote both down both things as numbers, you’d end up with a string of millions of numbers—just to store one photograph! This is why high-quality digital images often make enormous files on your computer. Each one can be several megabytes (millions of characters) in size.
Step back a decade and there was no comparison at all between the rough and clunky snapshot cameras on cellphones and even the most mediocre compact digital cameras. While the digitals were boasting ever-increasing numbers of megapixels, cellphones took crude snaps little better than the ones you could get from a basic webcam (1 megapixel or less was common). Now all that’s changed. The Canon Ixus/Powershot digital camera I use routinely is rated at 7.1 megapixels, which is perfectly fine for almost anything I ever want to do. My new LG smartphone comes in at 13 megapixels, which (theoretically, at least) sounds like it must be twice as good.
A camera works with the light of the visible spectrum or with other portions of the electromagnetic spectrum.[1] A still camera is an optical device which creates a single image of an object or scene and records it on an electronic sensor or photographic film. All cameras use the same basic design: light enters an enclosed box through a converging lens/convex lens and an image is recorded on a light-sensitive medium(mainly a transition metal-halide). A shutter mechanism controls the length of time that light can enter the camera.[2] Most photographic cameras have functions that allow a person to view the scene to be recorded, allow for a desired part of the scene to be in focus, and to control the exposure so that it is not too bright or too dim.[3] A display, often a liquid crystal display (LCD), permits the user to view the scene to be recorded and settings such as ISO speed, exposure, and shutter speed.[4][5]
One of the greatest joys of photography is being there at the right moment to capture the perfect shot before it’s gone forever. A point and shoot camera gives you the speed and simplicity to make sure you don’t miss that one-in-a-million photo. And today’s point and shoot cameras are made with some of the best features of the digital camera world for an image quality that just a few years ago was only available to those with a DSLR. And that’s what attracts so many people to a point and shoot: their small size and lighter weight mean you can take them anywhere so you’re always ready for that unexpected photo op. With the wide selection of digital cameras at Best Buy, you’re sure to find a point and shoot with exactly the set of features that match the way you use your camera.
http://all-the-best-info.com/cameras/camcorder/camera-quotes-small-camera.html

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A camcorder is an electronic device combining a video camera and a video recorder. Although marketing materials may use the colloquial term “camcorder”, the name on the package and manual is often “video camera recorder”. Most devices capable of recording video are camera phones and digital cameras primarily intended for still pictures; the term “camcorder” is used to describe a portable, self-contained device, with video capture and recording its primary function.
A digital camera or digicam is a camera that captures photographs in digital memory. Most cameras produced today are digital,[1] and while there are still compact cameras on the market, the use of dedicated digital cameras is dwindling, as digital cameras are now incorporated into many devices ranging from mobile devices to vehicles.[2] However, high-end, high-definition dedicated cameras are still commonly used by professionals.
Camera lenses are made in a wide range of focal lengths. They range from extreme wide angle, and standard, medium telephoto. Each lens is best suited to a certain type of photography. The extreme wide angle may be preferred for architecture because it has the capacity to capture a wide view of a building. The normal lens, because it often has a wide aperture, is often used for street and documentary photography. The telephoto lens is useful for sports and wildlife but it is more susceptible to camera shake.[52]
The exception is the Micro Four Thirds system, which is a lens format shared by Olympus and Panasonic, and utilized by more specialized cinema cameras made by companies like Blackmagic. The MFT sensor format is a 4:3 aspect ratio, as opposed to the 3:2 ratio used by most SLRs, and slightly smaller.
The Canon also scores with a much better, telescopic lens (technically rated 5.8–17.4 mm, which is equivalent to 35–105mm)—better quality and telescopic to boot—that can take everything from infinity-distance landscapes to close-up macro shots of spiders and flies. But I have to upload my photos to a computer to get a sense of how good or bad they are because the Canon only has a tiny 6cm (2.5-inch) LCD screen. The LG is over twice as good on the diagonal screen dimension, with a 14cm (5.5 inch) “monitor.” Where Canon estimates that the Ixus screen has 230,000 pixels, the LG boasts quad HD (2560×1440 pixels), or roughly sixteen times more. I might not be able to take better photos with the LG, but at least I can instantly assess and appreciate them on a screen as good as an HD TV (albeit still pocket-sized).
It turns out my Canon has a CMOS sensor (HD pro) which was fitted to the higher end G models in the range, which is why its such a brilliant performer. Canon have since replaced it with the HF R506 this year, which they have fitted with a Worse, smaller CMOS sensor – presumably to distance it from their higher end G range and not make the same mistake.
Our current pick, the Panasonic V750K, and the current pick, the V770K, are essentially identical cameras. They have identical specs, the same sensor, the same lens, the whole nine yards. So whichever one you can get for a lower cost is the one you should get. So what exactly is the difference between the two? According to the specifications, the V750K has a mini-HDMI port, where the V770K has a micro-HDMI. And then Panasonic told us that these shooting features had been added to the V770K: “Motion HDR function which reduces the overexposure and underexposure to produce video with wider dynamic range. Record beautiful video even in high contrast scene. Picture quality in low light has been improved.”
Sensor Size Full-Frame (24 x 36mm) mm Full-Frame (24 x 36mm) mm APS-C (15.7 x 23.7mm) mm APS-C (15.7 x 23.7mm) mm APS-C (23.5 x 15.6mm) mm 1″ (13.2 x 8.8mm) mm APS-C (22.3 x 14.9mm) 1/2.3″ (6.2 x 4.6mm) mm 1/2.3″ (6.2 x 4.6mm) mm 1/2.3″ (6.2 x 4.6mm) mm
You really miss the boat by eliminating anything without heart rate sensing. The Misfit Flash should be your Best Buy. It doesn’t have heart rate, true. No silent alarms. But for the basic activity tracking and sleep monitoring, it is as good as any. And it costs only $20. And it runs on a battery, so it never has to be charged. My Fitbit Charge now requires almost daily charging. The results of the two on fitness and sleep monitoring are very similar. So I’ve stopped the difficulty of daily charging my Fitbit and am quite happy with the Misfit Flash.
If you’re willing to live without a viewfinder of any sort and use the LCD to frame shots, you can find solid mirrorless models for under $500, including a kit lens. Like SLRs, different manufacturers support different lens formats. If you buy a Sony mirrorless camera, you’ll stick with Sony E and FE lenses, and if you opt for Fujifilm you’re locked into the X lens system.
You should also pay attention to magnification and coverage numbers for pentaprism finders, as they give you an idea of the actual size of the finder and how much of the captured image can be seen. In both cases you’ll want to look for a higher number.