camera exchange | digicam

I am using a Lumix FZ-200 which takes very sharp pictures and good video, but it is difficult to frame a moving subject such as a bird in flight at a higher zoom, and focusing is somewhat problematic. I’m wondering whether a dedicated videocam might make it easier to acquire the subject, focus it, and keep it in the frame, later allowing me to extract stills from the footage. Will I be disappointed?
Compacts often have macro capability and zoom lenses, but the zoom range (up to 30x) is generally enough for candid photography but less than is available on bridge cameras (more than 60x), or the interchangeable lenses of DSLR cameras available at a much higher cost.[15] Nowadays some pocket/compact cameras have topped up some bridge cameras with zoom capability up to 40x and 4K video which its video sensor is bigger than video sensor of a handycam.[16] Autofocus systems in compact digital cameras generally are based on a contrast-detection methodology using the image data from the live preview feed of the main imager. Some compact digital cameras use a hybrid autofocus system similar to what is commonly available on DSLRs. Some high end travel compact cameras have 30x optical zoom have full manual control with lens ring, electronic viewfinder, Hybrid Optical Image Stabilization, built-in flash, Full HD 60p, RAW, burst shooting up to 10fps, built-in Wi-Fi with NFC and GPS altogether.[17]
Older digital camcorders record video onto tape digitally, microdrives, hard drives, and small DVD-RAM or DVD-Rs. Newer machines since 2006 record video onto flash memory devices and internal solid-state drives in MPEG-1, MPEG-2 or MPEG-4 format.[11] Because these codecs use inter-frame compression, frame-specific editing requires frame regeneration, additional processing and may lose picture information. Codecs storing each frame individually, easing frame-specific scene editing, are common in professional use.
In near total darkness, the Panasonic automatically turns on a small LED light next to the lens. It is pretty weak and produces rather unflattering video that looks like a horror movie gone wrong, so it is best not used unless you have no other choice. At least you can disable it through the on-screen menu. The Panasonic is also the only model to offer a mount for attaching a separate light source—but this doesn’t power the light, which will need its own battery or plug.
There is a way to turn photos from an ordinary film camera into digital photos—by scanning them. A scanner is a piece of computer equipment that looks like a small photocopier but works like a digital camera. When you put your photos in a scanner, a light scans across them, turning them into strings of pixels and thus into digital images you can see on your computer.
Well good work getting into the world of DSLR photography, it’s a nice step up from point and shoots and I’m sure you’ll have fun. The great thing about DSLR’s is that there a tone of different options available, especially at budget prices. For starters, you could look at an older DSLR like the Nikon D3100. I used this DSLR when I started out and it’s a great entry level camera.
I will be primarily be using a ‘desk’ scenario and delivering 2-3 minute subject matter tutorials. Should I go for a shotgun mic like the Rode – or a lavalier mic setup (wired or wireless? Brand?) The intent also requires implementation of a ‘professional’ lighted studio area’ – with a kit for green screen / chroma key and backdrops. My intent is to deliver the best quality (video & sound) experience with a ‘medium’ budget.
In 1080p/60 AVCHD mode with the supplied battery, the Panasonic V720 has a battery-life rating of about 1.5 hours when recording continuously (no stopping and starting or zooming) and 45 mins. of “real world” usage (stopping/starting/zooming). There’s a longer-life battery pack sold separately (around $130 — the VW-VBT380) that boosts recording times up to 3 hours continuous / 1.5 hours real world.
Special camera systems are used for scientific research, e.g. on board a satellite or a spaceprobe, in artificial intelligence and robotics research, and in medical use. Such cameras are often tuned for non-visible radiation for infrared (for night vision and heat sensing) or X-ray (for medical and video astronomy use).
Single-shot capture systems use either one sensor chip with a Bayer filter mosaic, or three separate image sensors (one each for the primary additive colors red, green, and blue) which are exposed to the same image via a beam splitter (see Three-CCD camera).
In the 1830s, the English scientist Henry Fox Talbot independently invented a process to fix camera images using silver salts.[20] Although dismayed that Daguerre had beaten him to the announcement of photography, on January 31, 1839 he submitted a pamphlet to the Royal Institution entitled Some Account of the Art of Photogenic Drawing, which was the first published description of photography. Within two years, Talbot developed a two-step process for creating photographs on paper, which he called calotypes. The calotyping process was the first to utilize negative prints, which reverse all values in the photograph – black shows up as white and vice versa.[21] Negative prints allow, in principle, unlimited duplicates of the positive print to be made.[22] Calotyping also introduced the ability for a printmaker to alter the resulting image through retouching.[23] Calotypes were never as popular or widespread as daguerreotypes,[24] owing mainly to the fact that the latter produced sharper details.[25] However, because daguerreotypes only produce a direct positive print, no duplicates can be made. It is the two-step negative/positive process that formed the basis for modern photography.[26]
Similar in size to earlier ZS/TZ-series cameras, Panasonic however has managed to squeeze a much larger sensor into the ZS100 (TZ100 outside the US). This enables the pixels to be about 2.4x bigger than they are in models like the Lumix ZS70 / TZ90, and this helps the ZS100 produce much higher quality images. The zoom lens isn’t quite so extensive though, but you still get an electronic viewfinder that makes it easier to compose images in bright sunny conditions and in addition to 4K video recording, there’s Panasonic’s 4K Photo mode to help capture 8MP images of fleeting moments. It all adds up to be a powerful compact camera. Want even more zoom range? Panasonic’s just announced the Lumix ZS200 / TZ200 with a 15x optical zoom. Review coming very soon.
Camcorders are used by nearly all electronic media, from electronic-news organizations to current-affairs TV productions. In remote locations, camcorders are useful for initial video acquisition; the video is subsequently transmitted electronically to a studio or production center for broadcast. Scheduled events (such as press conferences), where a video infrastructure is readily available or can be deployed in advance, are still covered by studio-type video cameras “tethered” to production trucks.
Now overshadowed by the D850, the D810 is still a great buy. It’s built like a tank, it handles beautifully and it doesn’t cost the earth – well, when compared to competition that is. While the 36.3MP resolution has been eclipsed by the Canon EOS 5DS and Sony Alpha A7R II, it still delivers stunning results with huge amounts of detail. If you’re into sports, action and wildlife photography, the modest 5fps burst shooting might be a bit restrictive, but otherwise, the D810 is still a great DSLR that’s now better value than ever.
Sony likewise unveiled five cameras, again covering the entire gamut of the market, from $230 all the way up to $1,000. There’s the $230 CX405 with a 30x zoom and optical stabilization; the $300 CX440 and $400 PJ440 that add Wi-Fi, 8GB internal memory, and the ability to stream video to the specs of last year’s CX405—and the PJ440 has a built-in projector, too. The PJ670 will set you back $700, bumps up the internal memory to 32GB, has a larger, higher-resolution screen, an even better stabilization system, and a hot-shoe and input jack for microphones. However, all of these pack the same sensor as the one we saw in the CX330, which didn’t perform as well as those from Panasonic or Canon. Plus the replacement CX440 doesn’t seem to have done anything that would fix our problems with last year’s models.We also discounted Sony models that included pico projectors. While neat (and being able to show a video right after shooting is fun), the projector feature adds to the cost, typically pushing the price up by about $70. That removed models like the $400 Sony HDR PJ-275B, which is the projector-packing equivalent of the CX330 that we tested.
If you’re in the market for an interchangeable lens camera and want to keep the budget between $1,000 and $2,500, you have a lot of options. Perhaps too many. If you’re already invested in a system, it would take a much greener field to make you jump ship, and models in this price range are very close in terms of features, performance, and image quality.
Suffice to say, if it has buttons on it, I’ve probably reviewed it at some point over the last 20-odd years. This wide-ranging experience has taught me how to figure out not just how tech works, but how tech impacts people’s lives. My experience informs how the features that products offer can become useful (or, more often, not useful) when they get into users’ hands.
Need some help to decide between an action camera, video camera, or other — I enjoy recording video of my son’s hockey games, and then producing an after season highlight video for the parents. I have been using 2 action cameras at each end of the rink, but I would like to move to a better ‘follow-the-puck’ model, as well as get the front of the goal instead of the back all the time. However, I want to actually watch as the game is live (meaning, I don’t want to have to worry about the camera or look through the view finder all the time). Any recommendations from the experts out there? Thanks in advance
Sensor: APS-C CMOS | Megapixels: 24.2MP | Lens mount: Canon EF-S | Screen: 3-inch vari-angle touchscreen, 1,040,000 dots | Continuous shooting speed: 5fps | Max video resolution: 1080p | User level: Beginner
If nothing but the best will do, there are some excellent cameras on the market. These cameras all take external mics, have superior image and video quality, fast and accurate autofocus and interchangeable lenses. While learning to use all these features may take some time, the rewards are well worth the effort. These are some of the best cameras that money can buy!
The $600 Panasonic HC-V770K has the best video, audio, and stabilization quality out of all the cameras available. We like its clear, bright video in low light, and the audio quality from the built-in microphone (as well as the ability to connect an external microphone). In situations where other camcorders capture grainy video, the V770K’s video is still clean and sharp.
In CES (January) 2014, Sony announced the first consumer/low-end professional (“prosumer”) camcorder Sony FDR-AX100 with a 1″ 20.9MP sensor able to shoot 4K video in 3840×2160 pixels 30fps or 24fps in the XAVC-S format; in standard HD the camcorder can also deliver 60fps. When using the traditional format AVCHD, the camcorder supports 5.1 surround sound from its built-in microphone, this is however not supported in the XAVC-S format. The camera also has a 3-step ND filter switch for maintaining a shallow depth of field or a softer appearance to motion. For one hour video shooting in 4K the camera needs about 32 GB to accommodate a data transfer rate of 50 Mbit/s. The camera’s MSRP in the US is USD $2,000.[6]
Parenting and lifestyle vloggers who want the portability and power of a small camcorder will love the Canon Vixia HF R72. This small but powerful camcorder gets rid of all the things vloggers don’t need but keeps all the things they do. Packed with a 57x advanced zoom, image stabilizer, WiFi, external mic port, and flip screen, this camera makes capturing quality video a breeze.
The CMOS active pixel sensor “camera-on-a-chip” developed by Eric Fossum and his team in the early 1990s achieved the first step of realizing the modern camera phone as described in a March 1995 Business Week article. While the first camera phones (e.g. J-SH04), as successfully marketed by J-Phone in Japan, used charge-coupled device (CCD) sensors and not CMOS sensors, more than 90% of camera phones sold today[when?] use CMOS image sensor technology.[citation needed]
The 360-degree camera can take picture or video 360 degrees using two lenses back-to-back and shooting at the same time. Some of the cameras are Ricoh Theta S, Nikon Keymission 360 and Samsung Gear 360. Nico360 was launched in 2016 and claimed as the world’s smallest 360-degree camera with size 46 x 46 x 28 mm (1.8 x 1.8 x 1.1 in) and price less than $200. With virtual reality mode built-in stitching, Wifi, and Bluetooth, live streaming can be done. Due to it also being water resistant, the Nico360 can be used as action camera.[23]
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Dimensions 4.9 x 5.8 x 3.1 inches 4.6 x 5.9 x 3 inches 6.3 x 6.2 x 3.6 inches 4.5 x 5.8 x 3.2 inches 4.4 x 5.5 x 3.1 inches 4.1 x 5.6 x 3.2 inches 5.2 x 3.9 x 3 inches 4.1 x 5.5 x 3.1 inches 3.9 x 4.9 x 3 inches 3.8 x 4.9 x 2.8 inches
This came out just a few months ago and has some pretty sweet features including wifi which means you can transfer photos from your camera wirelessly on the move. Nikon also have a pretty new camera around the $500 mark called the D3400, it’s a lovely little camera and can shoot at around 5 frames per second. If you want to have a flip screen, I’d look at either the Canon T6i or T6s. They’ve also got fantastic autofocus as well.
Video quality in bright light is one of the easiest tests for a camcorder to pass—when it’s sunny out, capturing detail sharply is a no brainer. But specifically, the Panasonic had deep, saturated colors and sharp detail, so that when you’re recording a birthday party, every color on the piñata will pop and every piece of crêpe paper can be made out.
A ciné camera or movie camera takes a rapid sequence of photographs on image sensor or strips of film. In contrast to a still camera, which captures a single snapshot at a time, the ciné camera takes a series of images, each called a “frame” through the use of an intermittent mechanism.
That’s weird. I’ve got a pair of 770s. I bought one last year and another this year. So any firmware upgrades can be compared directly. I’ve got the Rode VideoMic Pro (set the mic to +20dB & the cam audio volume to -30dB) and a Shure PG58 dynamic cardioid (set the cam audio to -6dB) when I don’t use a in-line mixer. I use Adobe and for quicky stuff MS moviemaker, but the sound always comes in at normal levels with both mics. Maybe your input jack is fried. I had the latter issue with my Canon 5DII.
HTC RE HTC also announced an external camera module for smartphones, which can capture 16 MP still shots and Full HD videos. The RE Module is also waterproof and dustproof, so it can be used in a variety of conditions.[11]
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From what I’ve said so far, you can see that digital cameras are great things—if you’re comparing them to old-style film cameras, that is. Thanks to their superb, cutting-edge image sensors, there’s really no good reason (other than a nostalgic preference for analog technology) to use film. You might be forgiven for thinking sales of digital cameras would be rocketing as a result, but you’d be wrong. Over the last few years, digital cameras have seen double-digit falls in sales in parallel with the massive rise of smartphones and tablets (which now sell more than a billion each year). Check out a photo-sharing site like Flickr and you’ll find the most popular “cameras” are actually phones: in June 2017, at the time I’m writing this, Flickr’s top five cameras include four iPhone models and the Samsung Galaxy—all five of them smartphones. Is there a good reason to own a standalone digital camera anymore or can you now do everything with a camera phone?
These cameras often lose some of the automatic modes that beginner DSLRs offer so if you purchase one you are going to have to spend some time learning to shoot in manual and semi-manual modes. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing, though, because it will force you to learn to shoot manual sooner — which you will want to do eventually anyway. Starting out with a pro-level camera is a great option for people who know they want to take their photography seriously. It may also save you money in the long run because you won’t have to upgrade your body as soon.
Special uses of video cameras include systems that capture images at the finish line to time races and sporting events. Some toll roads use video cameras to make pictures of the license plate of any car that fails to pay tolls. Computers then identify the drivers and mail enforcement letters to collect the missed tolls.