camera focus | camera zoom

I really appreciate the review. The option of streaming directly to UStream is great, not having to buy a HD capture card is the main reason. That said, getting the 2nd place Cannon and one or two of the HD capture devices for around $200 will come in under the price of the Panasonic.
You won’t be able to shoot video with an XTi. You will want to explore some of the newer options in the Rebel lineup. Video shooting as a feature began in that lineup with the T1i/500D. See more here: https://www.borrowlenses.com/AdvancedSearch.do?searchString=Rebel
Consumer-grade tapeless camcorders include a USB port to transfer video onto a computer. Professional models include other options like Serial digital interface (SDI) or HDMI. Some tapeless camcorders are equipped with a Firewire (IEEE-1394) port to ensure compatibility with magnetic tape-based DV and HDV formats.
If you’ve ever wanted to record a music recital or a play, a DSLR will leave you hanging, because it won’t be able to record the whole thing. Many cameras can only shoot clips of 10 or 20 minutes, occasionally getting up to 30, after which the image sensor has to cool down. Video cameras can shoot for as long as there is space on the memory card. On a camera like the Canon HF500, that means between two and half hours (at highest quality) and over 12 hours at lowest quality on a 32GB memory card.
Canon announced the followup to its R600 with the unsurprisingly named R700 ($300, shipping in February). The R600 was essentially identical to the R500 that preceded it, and the R700 seems extremely similar, too. It appears to have the same design, sensor, and lens as its two predecessors, with the addition of a brighter LCD screen and a new UI. One notable improvement is that the video camera will come bundled with the higher capacity BP-727, which can give you up to an extra 55 minutes of recording time, and goes for $80 on its own. Canon also updated the R70 and R72 along similar lines from the R50/R60, and R52/R62, including built-in storage and connectivity as improvement over the base model.
Do you have any thoughts on the $100-$150 Chinese knock-offs? They even come with an external mic that some reviews say is surprisingly good. I would like to film more than a week, but I don’t know yet if this is something I will keep doing or if I will discover it’s too much hassle, so I don’t want to spend too much on a camera, but my phone is just an LG Stylo 2 ($240 new), so I don’t think the video or sound quality will be good enough from that.
You can also buy a new 35mm or medium format camera. You don’t have as many options for getting film developed as you used to—if you’re in a major city it’ll be easy to find a lab, but you may have to resort to mail order if you’re not close to a metropolis. You can find old film SLRs and compacts in thrift shops and online stores pretty easily. If you’re intent on buying a new model, Lomography still makes a bunch of different ones, from toy models like the Sprocket Rocket, which captures panoramic shots with exposed sprockets, to premium options like the medium format LC-A 120.
Overlooked factor is the angle camera shoots. You need that for selfies but makes forward shooting much more pleasant too. Here the Canon does poorly and I am thinking about switching from Canon to Panasonic because of that.
Image capture can be achieved through various combinations of shutter speed, aperture, and film or sensor speed. Different (but related) settings of aperture and shutter speed enable photographs to be taken under various conditions of film or sensor speed, lighting and motion of subjects or camera, and desired depth of field. A slower speed film will exhibit less “grain”, and a slower speed setting on an electronic sensor will exhibit less “noise”, while higher film and sensor speeds allow for a faster shutter speed, which reduces motion blur or allows the use of a smaller aperture to increase the depth of field.
The effective aperture is expressed by an f-number or f-stop (derived from focal ratio), which is proportional to the ratio of the focal length to the diameter of the aperture. Longer focal length lenses will pass less light through the same aperture diameter due to the greater distance the light has to travel; shorter focal length lenses will transmit more light through the same diameter of aperture.
Some of these image-editing techniques are built into more sophisticated digital cameras. You might have a camera that has an optical zoom and a digital zoom. An optical zoom means that the lens moves in and out to make the incoming image bigger or smaller when it hits the CCD. A digital zoom means that the microchip inside the camera blows up the incoming image without actually moving the lens. So, just like moving closer to a TV set, the image degrades in quality. In short, optical zooms make images bigger and just as clear, but digital zooms make images bigger and more blurred.
DSLR cameras with high-definition video were also introduced early in the 21st century. Although they still have the handling and usability deficiencies of other multipurpose devices, HDSLR video offers the shallow depth-of-field and interchangeable lenses lacking in consumer camcorders. Professional video cameras with these capabilities are more expensive than the most expensive video-capable DSLR. In video applications where the DSLR’s operational deficiencies can be mitigated, DSLRs such as the Canon 5D Mark II provide depth-of-field and optical-perspective control.
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If you’ve ever looked at a television screen close up, you will have noticed that the picture is made up of millions of tiny colored dots or squares called pixels. Laptop LCD computer screens also make up their images using pixels, although they are often much too small to see. In a television or computer screen, electronic equipment switches all these colored pixels on and off very quickly. Light from the screen travels out to your eyes and your brain is fooled into see a large, moving picture.
The lens of a camera captures the light from the subject and brings it to a focus on the sensor. The design and manufacture of the lens is critical to the quality of the photograph being taken. The technological revolution in camera design in the 19th century revolutionized optical glass manufacture and lens design with great benefits for modern lens manufacture in a wide range of optical instruments from reading glasses to microscopes. Pioneers included Zeiss and Leitz.
Of course, a smartphone or tablet is fine for the odd selfie or video—they are easy to carry and shoot with when you need them. But if you want your video to be more than a cute five-second clip on Facebook, a video camera is what you need; modern video cameras are small and light enough that they won’t weigh you down.
Although the idea for a digital camera originated in 1961, the technology to create one didn’t exist. The first digital camera was invented in 1975 by Steven Sasson, an engineer at Eastman Kodak. It primarily used a charged-coupled device, a type of image sensor, but originally used a camera tube for image capture. That functionality was later digitized by Kodak. The first digital cameras were used by the military and for scientific purposes. Medical businesses and News reporting companies began to use digital cameras a few years later.
If you open up a digital photograph in a paint (image editing) program, you can change it in all kinds of ways. A program like this works by adjusting the numbers that represent each pixel of the image. So, if you click on a control that makes the image 20 percent brighter, the program goes through all the numbers for each pixel in turn and increases them by 20 percent. If you mirror an image (flip it horizontally), the program reverses the sequence of the numbers it stores so they run in the opposite direction. What you see on the screen is the image changing as you edit or manipulate it. But what you don’t see is the paint program changing all the numbers in the background.
Most digital cameras save both video and photos onto memory cards. Those memory cards will have a maximum storage capacity of a few GB (gigabytes), which is only enough to hold a small amount of video. On the other hand, a hard-drive digital camcorder can have a built-in hard drive of 160+ GB, making it possible for hold substantially more video at a time than its still camera counterparts.
Many cameras, especially high-end ones, support a raw image format. A raw image is the unprocessed set of pixel data directly from the camera’s sensor, often saved in a proprietary format. Adobe Systems has released the DNG format, a royalty-free raw image format used by at least 10 camera manufacturers.
Formats for movies are AVI, DV, MPEG, MOV (often containing motion JPEG), WMV, and ASF (basically the same as WMV). Recent formats include MP4, which is based on the QuickTime format and uses newer compression algorithms to allow longer recording times in the same space.
DSLR (digital single-lens reflex) cameras largely replaced film-based SLRs during the 2000s. DSLRs are the most advanced and versatile cameras available to consumers today. They give you the most control over how your pictures are taken, and are thus meant for more serious amateur photographers and professionals. DSLRs allow you complete control over exposure settings, including aperture priority, shutter priority, and various program modes. Their fast autofocus produces great shots when shooting fast-moving subjects or scenes. They also utilize an interchangeable lens system, enabling photographers to use the most appropriate lens for whatever they are shooting. Finally, DSLRs have large sensors, which generally produce higher-quality images. Learn More About DSLRs.
The DSLR will definitely take better quality video—but with a whole pile of caveats. You want to talk about awkward to hold? Keeping a heavy DSLR in place while trying to shoot without adding a dedicated grip system is a whole different battle.You’ll also be limited to just 30 minutes of recording at a time, and one you add in lenses it’ll weigh a ton more. The advantage to a video camera is that they’re small, light, comfortable to hold, pack a lot of zoom, and have a control scheme that’s easy to use while you’re shooting video. Sure, your DSLR will probably capture better footage, but a video camera will be better to use for it.
Brilliant my friend. Thanks for the links. Regarding the lens, which lens I should order with the camera body for my purpose? or it is already include a lens with it or it is only the body and I buy the lens in my own?
Why this randomly gets turned off isn’t clear, but its’ likely that users either disabled the camera at some point or perhaps were hiding other apps and included the Camera app erroneously. Some users report this happened without any user intervention, which is a curious observation.
Of course, where smartphone cameras really score is in the “smartphone” department: they’re computers, in essence, that are pop-in-the-pocket portable and always online. So not only are you more likely to capture chance photos (because you’re always carrying a camera), but you can instantly upload your snaps to the aptly-named Instagram, Facebook, or Twitter. And that’s the real reason why smartphone cameras have surpassed old-school digitals: photography itself has changed from the digital-equivalent of the 19th-century Daguerreotype (itself a throwback to the portrait paintings of old) to something more off-the-cuff, immediate, and, of course, social. For the purposes of Facebook or Twitter, often viewed on small-screen mobile devices, you don’t need more than a couple of megapixels, at most. (Prove it yourself by downloading a hi-res image from Instagram or Flickr, and you’ll find it’s seldom more than a couple of hundred kilobytes in size and 1000 megapixels or less in each dimension, making less than one megapixel in total.) Even on better photo-sharing websites like Instagram and Flickr, most people will never be browsing your photos in multi-megapixel dimensions: they simply wouldn’t fit on the screen. So even if your smartphone doesn’t have masses of megapixels, it doesn’t really matter: most people flicking through your photos on their smartphones won’t notice—or care. Social media means never having to say you’re sorry you forgot your DSLR and only had your iPhone!
Type: Mirrorless | Sensor size: Micro Four Thirds | Resolution: 16.1MP | Lens: Micro Four Thirds | Screen type: 3.0-inch tilting touchscreen, 1,370,000 dots | Viewfinder: EVF | Maximum continuous shooting rate: 8.6fps | Movies: 4K | User level: Beginner/enthusiast
Cameras in many of the latest smartphones offer consistent quality photos and are extremely convenient since many people always have their phones with them. With a smartphone camera, there is also the benefit of instantly sharing your photos with family or friends. On the other hand, even low-end point and shoot cameras offer more photo-taking versatility than smartphones, including real zoom and other lens manipulation. Though some smartphones have manual controls so you can fine-tune photo exposure, many do not, and poor results in low light situations are not uncommon.
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Video is only half the story: the rest comes from the sound that accompanies it. A video camera’s weak point is often audio, but these models show that there has been some improvement in recent years.
There is a saying in photography that the best camera is the one that is with you and for many of us, a smartphone camera is it. The iPhone 6s and Samsung S5 are both able to shoot 4K video on their front camera, but that resolution drops significantly when you flip it around. What these phones lack in resolution and low light performance they make up for in being tiny, lightweight, and always on hand.
Sensor: APS-C CMOS | Megapixels: 24.2MP | Lens mount: Canon EF-S | Screen: 3-inch articulating touchscreen, 1,040,000 dots | Continuous shooting speed: 6fps | Max video resolution: 1080p | User level: Beginner/enthusiast
When using lenses designed for full-frame (FX) cameras on DX cameras, the lenses are magnified by 1.5x, making them useful for shooting distant subjects and sports. On an FX-format camera with a DX lens mounted, the camera will automatically engage its built–in DX crop mode, thus recording an image only from the center section of the sensor.
Steven Sasson, an engineer at Eastman Kodak, invented and built the first self-contained electronic camera that used a charge-coupled device image sensor in 1975.[4][5][6] Early uses were mainly military and scientific; followed by medical and news applications.[citation needed]
Meanwhile, it looks like the Panasonic V750 has spiked in price, marking it as more expensive than the V770, which is an all but identical newer model. In which case, I’d say go with the cheaper of the two.