camera comparison | camera effects

You have some options but none of them perfect. There is the RX10 IV (https://www.borrowlenses.com/product/Sony-Cyber-shot-RX10-IV?INTPR=BLOG-BL-FIELD-2016-VLOGGING) but it’s a “bridge” camera and a little big compared to the RX100 IV or V. The screen also just tilts – it doesn’t articulate. The Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ2500 is also a bigger bridge but has the fully articulating screen. Both have mic inputs. DPReview has a nice “Camera Feature Search” where you can choose your form factor, features, and price point and see what’s available on the market (sorry for the long and ugly URL): https://www.dpreview.com/products/search/cameras#criterias=SpecsCoreParams%2CSpecsMicrophonePort&paramSpecsCoreParamsBodyType=UltraCompact%2CCompact%2CLargeSensorCompact%2CSLRLikeCompact&paramSpecsMicrophonePort=Yes
Definitely will be looking at this model. However, a question for the mods here – if I wanted to go “next tier” with video, what should I be looking into? Something solid and versatile, an “all-around” camera that performs well at night and during other tricky conditions, shoots in at least 720×1080, has robust functionality, includes external mic hookup, can mount different lenses… I thought a lot of DSLRs do video too, but I didn’t see too much on your reviews about that, and it seems that the target market for those fancy $1k+ pieces of equipment are primarily professional photographers…
The focal-plane shutter operates as close to the film plane as possible and consists of cloth curtains that are pulled across the film plane with a carefully determined gap between the two curtains (typically running horizontally) or consisting of a series of metal plates (typically moving vertically) just in front of the film plane. The focal-plane shutter is primarily associated with the single lens reflex type of cameras, since covering the film rather than blocking light passing through the lens allows the photographer to view through the lens at all times except during the exposure itself. Covering the film also facilitates removing the lens from a loaded camera (many SLRs have interchangeable lenses).
The Canon M40 debuted at $700 when it came out in 2011. The Canon R600 debuted at $400 when it came out this year. They’re vastly different cameras, with the M40 representing a higher-end model in Canon’s lineup. For something similar that’s currently available, have a look at the Canon G20.
Now overshadowed by the D850, the D810 is still a great buy. It’s built like a tank, it handles beautifully and it doesn’t cost the earth – well, when compared to competition that is. While the 36.3MP resolution has been eclipsed by the Canon EOS 5DS and Sony Alpha A7R II, it still delivers stunning results with huge amounts of detail. If you’re into sports, action and wildlife photography, the modest 5fps burst shooting might be a bit restrictive, but otherwise, the D810 is still a great DSLR that’s now better value than ever.
Thank you so much for doing all of this, extremely helpfull! I love you guys and wish you the best and just want to say I only shop through amazon smile now so please consider making a link for that. But I will never forget you guys and will refer to you as often as possible. Thanks again ~ Adam
For many years, exposure times were long enough that the photographer simply removed the lens cap, counted off the number of seconds (or minutes) estimated to be required by the lighting conditions, then replaced the cap. As more sensitive photographic materials became available, cameras began to incorporate mechanical shutter mechanisms that allowed very short and accurately timed exposures to be made.
Due to the optical properties of photographic lenses, only objects within a limited range of distances from the camera will be reproduced clearly. The process of adjusting this range is known as changing the camera’s focus. There are various ways of focusing a camera accurately. The simplest cameras have fixed focus and use a small aperture and wide-angle lens to ensure that everything within a certain range of distance from the lens, usually around 3 metres (10 ft) to infinity, is in reasonable focus. Fixed focus cameras are usually inexpensive types, such as single-use cameras. The camera can also have a limited focusing range or scale-focus that is indicated on the camera body. The user will guess or calculate the distance to the subject and adjust the focus accordingly. On some cameras this is indicated by symbols (head-and-shoulders; two people standing upright; one tree; mountains).
The other option would be to alter the frame rate of the recording, which I’m pretty sure you can do. According to the manual, “Scene(s) recorded in the recording format [MP4/iFrame], scene(s) saved in MP4 (1920k1080/25p), MP4 (1280k720/ 25p) or MP4 (640k360/25p): “MP4/iFrame scene(s)”
Panasonic’s small but mighty Lumix GH4 mirrorless camera is designed for people who want to take both beautiful photos and high quality 4K video. With a flip out screen, built-in image stabilization, and 49 autofocus points, this thing can handle pretty much anything a vlogger throws its way. This is ideal for lifestyle vloggers who want superior optical quality in a portable package.
The first camera using digital electronics to capture and store images was developed by Kodak engineer Steven Sasson in 1975. He used a charge-coupled device (CCD) provided by Fairchild Semiconductor, which provided only 0.01 megapixels to capture images. Sasson combined the CCD device with movie camera parts to create a digital camera that saved black and white images onto a cassette tape.[43] The images were then read from the cassette and viewed on a TV monitor.[44] Later, cassette tapes were replaced by flash memory.
http://all-the-best-info.com/cameras/camera/camera-quotes-digital-camera-case.html

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Late 1700s: Thomas Wedgwood (1771-1805) and Sir Humphry Davy (1778–1829), two English scientists, carried out early experiments trying to record images on light-sensitive paper. Their photos were not permanent: they turned black unless permanently stored in a dark place.
Resale value. There is a large market for used DSLRs so if you do decide at some point that photography isn’t for you or—more likely—that you want to upgrade to an even better DSLR, you probably won’t have much trouble selling yours. This will help you recoup the costs if you realize you don’t like photography or help you purchase your next camera if you decide that you really do!
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Just like D500, the EOS 7D Mark II borrows many of its features from its big brother, the EOS-1D X (that’s now been replaced by the EOS-1D X Mark II), bringing 10fps shooting and a professional autofocus system to the amateur market. Now you can shoot action and sports like the pros, but at a price within the reach of enthusiasts. The EOS 7D Mark II isn’t just a high-speed specialists, it’s a terrific all-round camera. It’s tough, with an alloy body and weather-sealed controls, it has a great sensor with an advanced dual-pixel hybrid autofocus system, and it’s a powerful video camera too.
When shopping for a starter camera, ask yourself some questions about what you want. Take a look at the size, as a camera isn’t any good if you’re not going to use it. But also think about connectivity—you probably want to copy images to your smartphone easily—and price. Ease of use isn’t a huge hurdle these days—everything has an auto mode—but models with guided interfaces will let you take some sort of control over how your photos turn out, without having to know too much technical jargon.
If you’re new to vlogging or not sure that you want to invest in expensive gear, there are plenty of ways to get started. These entry-level cameras can also buy you some time while you figure out exactly what you want. Renting gives you the opportunity to see which camera fits your needs at a very reasonable price. “Try before you buy” is always a good idea!
I really appreciate the review. The option of streaming directly to UStream is great, not having to buy a HD capture card is the main reason. That said, getting the 2nd place Cannon and one or two of the HD capture devices for around $200 will come in under the price of the Panasonic.
Professionals can achieve amazing results with smartphones—but so can amateurs, with a bit of extra help. One of the drawbacks of smartphone cameras is the lack of manual control (generally even less than with a basic compact digital camera). You can get around that, to a certain extent, by using add-on apps that give you much more control over fiddly, old-school settings like ISO, aperture, shutter speed, and white balance. (Search your favorite app store for keywords like “professional photography” or “manual photography”.) You can also add snap-on lenses to smartphones to get around the drawbacks of a fixed-focal-length lens (though there’s nothing you can do about the tiny, poorer-quality image sensor). Once your photos are safely snapped, there are plenty of photo-editing apps for smartphones as well, including a slimmed-down, free version of PhotoShop, which can help you retouch your amateur “sow’s ears” into professional “silk purses.”
Look inside any professional photographer’s bag and there is a really good chance that you will see a Canon 5D Mark III. This camera is the workhorse of the photography world and one of the best on the market. Beginners will appreciate the 5D Mark III’s low-light performance, higher burst rate (6 FPS) and fast and accurate autofocus. This is simply one of the best cameras you can buy and, while it will take some learning for a true beginner, with this camera the sky is the limit. This camera was released in 2013 and has been upstaged by the recently-released 5D Mark IV. Regardless of its age, this camera has stood the test of time and has a worthy place in any photographer’s bag.
Frames per second. The number of frames that a camera can shoot in a second matters mostly for photographers who want to shoot moving objects. The more frames you can take in a second, the better chance that you are going to get exactly what you are trying to capture. Photographers who shoot sports, wildlife or energized toddlers will especially appreciate faster shooting rates.
Weight. These suckers are heavy! Crop sensor DSLRs aren’t light and when you move into full frame cameras the weight goes up even more. We’re not talking about lugging around a pile of rocks but they’re heavy enough that you probably won’t want to carry one around all day.
Thanks for the quick reply!! I think i’m gonna go the vidcam route. Let my wife man the DSLR, I’ll do the video. My guess is that the difficulty of using the DLSR (ergo as well as accessing the functions during filming) would end up making the DSLR videos worse in terms of cinematics, even though the images might be higher quality…i.e., i’ll get high quality video that’s not shot very well…and i’m guessing that the delta between image quality isn’t great, particularly when viewed from my amateur eyes. ?
Closed-circuit television (CCTV) generally use pan tilt zoom cameras (PTZ), for security, surveillance, and/or monitoring purposes. Such cameras are designed to be small, easily hidden, and able to operate unattended; those used in industrial or scientific settings are often meant for use in environments that are normally inaccessible or uncomfortable for humans, and are therefore hardened for such hostile environments (e.g. radiation, high heat, or toxic chemical exposure).
I’ve got canon EOS 70D bundled with Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 STM lens as it is the best one in this price range for auto focus feature especially that I will always be indoors, beside if you exceeded the recording duration limit it will stop recording and start recording a new one till your memory card getting full, and of course it will be helpful for ransom request videos… or maybe masturbation ?
Canon’s EOS 5D series of cameras has a rich heritage – the original EOS 5D bought full-frame photography to the masses, the Mark II unleashed Full HD video capture for the first time on a DSLR, and while the Mark III became a firm favourite amongst photographers. The EOS 5D Mark IV pretty much tweaks and improves on everything before it, with a new 30.4MP sensor and advanced 61-point AF system. A brilliant DSLR that was until recently our top pick, but the arrival of the D850 means it slips a place down to number two.
Sensor: APS-C CMOS | Megapixels: 24.2MP | Lens mount: Canon EF-S | Screen: 3-inch articulating touchscreen, 1,040,000 dots | Continuous shooting speed: 5fps | Max video resolution: 1080p | User level: Beginner
Some DSLRs feature sensors that are equal in size to 35mm film. These full frame cameras are generally more expensive than their APS-C counterparts. If you see yourself moving up to a full frame in the future, be careful in buying lenses. Some are designed to be used with APS-C sensors. Canon refers to its APS-C lens line as EF-S, while lenses that cover full frame are EF. Nikon takes a similar approach, calling APS-C lenses DX and full frame lenses FX. Sony adds a DT designation to its APS-C-only lenses, and Pentax designates its APS-C lenses as DA.
There is a way to turn photos from an ordinary film camera into digital photos—by scanning them. A scanner is a piece of computer equipment that looks like a small photocopier but works like a digital camera. When you put your photos in a scanner, a light scans across them, turning them into strings of pixels and thus into digital images you can see on your computer.