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If you the camcorer has trouble focusing on golf ball as it comes down, you can try using the manual focus. Just pre-focus it for the roughly distance you expect the ball to fall down at. Manual adjustments on the V750/W850 are done on a little dial instead of the usual ring controller, which makes it hard to do on the fly adjustments IMO. It would be easier to just preset it and try to work with that.
Multi-shot exposes the sensor to the image in a sequence of three or more openings of the lens aperture. There are several methods of application of the multi-shot technique. The most common originally was to use a single image sensor with three filters passed in front of the sensor in sequence to obtain the additive color information. Another multiple shot method is called Microscanning. This method uses a single sensor chip with a Bayer filter and physically moved the sensor on the focus plane of the lens to construct a higher resolution image than the native resolution of the chip. A third version combined the two methods without a Bayer filter on the chip.
The $600 Panasonic HC-V770K is the best video camera for those who want a bit more than what their smartphone or even DSLR has to offer. Also referred to as a camcorder, this video camera was proved best after 30 hours of research and testing, which included interviewing experts and shooting hours of video in a huge range of conditions. The HC-V770K captures video that has more detail, better color, and better sound than the footage from all the cameras we tested (or any camera up to twice its price). In our tests, it produced the sharpest footage in bright light, plus it had the best stabilization and the least noise in low light. It also features the best touchscreen controls of the bunch and, with a long 20x optical zoom, you can capture the action from across a huge space—try to do that with a smartphone.
Webcams are video cameras which stream a live video feed to a computer. Larger video cameras (especially camcorders and CCTV cameras) can be similarly used, though they may need an analog-to-digital converter in order to store the output on a computer or digital video recorder or send it to a wider network.
Some experimental cameras, for example the planar Fourier capture array (PFCA), do not require focusing to allow them to take pictures. In conventional digital photography, lenses or mirrors map all of the light originating from a single point of an in-focus object to a single point at the sensor plane. Each pixel thus relates an independent piece of information about the far-away scene. In contrast, a PFCA does not have a lens or mirror, but each pixel has an idiosyncratic pair of diffraction gratings above it, allowing each pixel to likewise relate an independent piece of information (specifically, one component of the 2D Fourier transform) about the far-away scene. Together, complete scene information is captured and images can be reconstructed by computation.
Unfortunately, I don’t know enough about the X920 to comment off hand, but Reviewed.com has Reviewed both it at the Panasonic W850, which I believe has the same sensor as the V750/770, but with a few more bells and whistles (I might be wrong on that, these things get very confusing). So you can check out a bit of a comparison between the two by looking at the two reviews.
Travel vloggers want light setups with excellent image quality to show amazing locations. Beauty vloggers need sharp optics, excellent autofocus, and high-quality audio. Family vloggers want highly portable cameras that can withstand the demands of a rough and tumble bunch of kids and all the chaos and fun that they bring.
The Sony a7RII is a giant of a camera – in a really small package. This mirrorless camera’s 42 megapixel full frame sensor is one of the best on the market and has become a staple in the arsenals of many an adventure and travel photographer. Don’t believe us? Check out the work of professional surf photographer Chris Burkard who does 70% of his work with this little dynamo. Beginners will love that this camera takes pin-sharp pictures and fits in the palm of your hand. This camera is as good as any DSLR — and way smaller.
Video cameras are used primarily in two modes. The first, characteristic of much early broadcasting, is live television, where the camera feeds real time images directly to a screen for immediate observation. A few cameras still serve live television production, but most live connections are for security, military/tactical, and industrial operations where surreptitious or remote viewing is required. In the second mode the images are recorded to a storage device for archiving or further processing; for many years, videotape was the primary format used for this purpose, but was gradually supplanted by optical disc, hard disk, and then flash memory. Recorded video is used in television production, and more often surveillance and monitoring tasks in which unattended recording of a situation is required for later analysis.
However, I’m betting most of them won’t fire the flash at the same time, since that would screw up your video recording pretty badly. And unfortunately the 30 minute time limit is hard to work around. That’s in place due to EU tariffs that have a significantly lower import tax on cameras vs camcorders, so camera makers intentionally hard code the recording time limit to just 30 minutes so that the camera is considered a still photo camera rather than video camera when it is shipped in.
But lens options aren’t as vast as they are with the Canon and Nikon SLR systems. You have a much larger selection with a Canon or Nikon, including many excellent third-party options from Sigma and Tamron. SLR lens options like the Sigma 150-600mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM Contemporary aren’t matched by mirrorless in terms of value, and you also have access to exotic glass like the AF-S Nikkor 800mm f/5.6E FL ED VR ($16,299.95), the likes of which simply isn’t available in a mirrorless format at this time.
Since many people now own a smartphone, the real question is whether you need a digital camera as well. It’s very hard to see an argument for point-and-shoot compacts anymore: for social-media snaps, most of us can get by with our phones. For this website, I take a lot of macro photos—close-ups of circuits and mechanical parts—with my Ixus that I couldn’t possibly capture with the LG, so I won’t be jumping ship anytime soon.
At the high end you can go for a sensor that’s about 54 by 40mm in size, just about matching the 645 film size. We’ve reviewed one of these cameras so far—the insanely expensive Phase One XF 100MP. It offers Raw image capture at 100MP resolution, which is more than overkill for the vast majority of photographers.
Focal-plane shutters are also difficult to synchronise with flash bulbs and electronic flash and it is often only possible to use flash at shutter speeds where the curtain that opens to reveal the film completes its run and the film is fully uncovered, before the second curtain starts to travel and cover it up again. Typically 35mm film SLRs could sync flash at only up to 1/60th second if the camera has horizontal run cloth curtains, and 1/125th if using a vertical run metal shutter.
The forerunner to the photographic camera was the camera obscura. Camera obscura (Latin for “dark room”) is the natural phenomenon that occurs when an image of a scene at the other side of a screen (or for instance a wall) is projected through a small hole in that screen and forms an inverted image (left to right and upside down) on a surface opposite to the opening. The oldest known record of this principle is a description by Han Chinese philosopher Mozi (ca. 470 to ca. 391 BC). Mozi correctly asserted the camera obscura image is inverted because light travels inside the camera straight lines from its source.
When you want to take a photograph with a film camera, you have to press a button. This operates a mechanism called the shutter, which makes a hole (the aperture) open briefly at the front of the camera, allowing light to enter through the lens (a thick piece of glass or plastic mounted on the front). The light causes reactions to take place in the chemicals on the film, thus storing the picture in front of you.
To the best of my knowledge, if you’re going to switch to a video camera to better follow the action, you’re going to need someone manning the thing and tracking the puck as it moves—which means you’re less able to watch the game unfold as a spectator. There might be a way if you record the entire game from a wide-angle to just zoom/crop down on the puck and follow it that way, but that’ll lead to a certain amount of quality degradation since you’re essentially blowing up a low res section of the video.
Rugged compact cameras typically include protection against submersion, hot and cold conditions, shock and pressure. Terms used to describe such properties include waterproof, freezeproof, heatproof, shockproof and crushproof, respectively. Nearly all major camera manufacturers have at least one product in this category. Some are waterproof to a considerable depth up to 82 feet (27 m);[21] others only 10 feet (3m), but only a few will float. Ruggeds often lack some of the features of ordinary compact camera, but they have video capability and the majority can record sound. Most have image stabilization and built-in flash. Touchscreen LCD and GPS do not work under water.
Video cameras originally designed for television broadcast were large and heavy, mounted on special pedestals and wired to remote recorders in separate rooms. As technology improved, out-of-studio video recording was possible with compact video cameras and portable video recorders; a detachable recording unit could be carried to a shooting location. Although the camera itself was compact, the need for a separate recorder made on-location shooting a two-person job.[3] Specialized videocassette recorders were introduced by JVC (VHS) and Sony (U-matic, with Betamax) releasing a model for mobile work. Portable recorders meant that recorded video footage could be aired on the early-evening news, since it was no longer necessary to develop film.
There are some rough edges, though. The daylight video had flatter colors and less detail compared to the Panasonic. When in low light, the gap between the two widened: the Canon’s footage was downright dull, with significant noise and obscured details. The Canon does have a low-light scene mode that improves sharpness somewhat at the cost of a slow shutter speed. This leads to blurry motion: pan the camera, and the entire scene becomes a smeared mess. While worse than the Panasonic, the Canon did outperformed the Sony HDR-CX330, which had even more visible and distracting noise, as well as an inferior stabilization system that lead to footage that looked less natural.
If you want a camera that’s easy to use, tough enough to be tossed in your purse, backpack, or glove box, and that takes good pictures, too, then the Nikon CoolPix A900 Digital Camera is your go-to choice. I’ve owned three variations of this camera and each was my go-to for the casual photography that comes with nights out at bars or concerts, day hikes, trips to the zoo or beach, and so on. If I hadn’t dropped my first CoolPix camera in a stream in L.A.’s Griffith Park and dropped the second on Constitution Avenue in downtown D.C., I would likely still be using the first one I ever bought. It’s a testament to the quality of these cameras that I keep coming back to them, and a testament to my own bad luck when it comes to my accidental destruction of cameras. The compact, rectangular Nikon CoolPix A900 slips into a small bag or even into your pocket, yet the lens extends far enough out for an impressive 35x optical zoom. Paired with a 20-megapixel sensor, that zoom capability allows for great shots snapped from near or far.
For our hands on testing in 2014, we were left with three contenders: the $310 Canon Vixia HF R500, the $600 Panasonic HC-V750K and the $290 Sony Handycam HDR-CX330. We borrowed or bought these models to put through a series of tests. Since then, both Canon and Panasonic have replaced these units with newer ones, but that are all but identical from what we can tell, except for maybe some minor new shooting settings and a new model number. The Canon Vixia HF R500 was replaced with the Canon VIXIA HF R600, the Panasonic HC-V770K followed the V750K. Both of these models have the same sensor and internals as their predecessors, so we’re comfortable basing their performance on older models.
So, for that price point it’s going to be tough to get everything you want. Before you dive straight into cameras, if your 8 yo already has access to a computer then you might want to consider a new webcam instead. Webcams have come a long way in quality and variety and tend to be pretty affordable. But before you do that, you might want to make a list of things that are important: will they want a touchscreen LCD or is navigating a menu system fine for them? Do they need a tilting screen or a fully articulating screen for “selfie” mode? Is slow motion video mode something they want? Do they really want to record in 1080p or is 720p sufficient? Will they ever want to use an external microphone or is in-camera mic good enough? That’s a lot for an 8 yo, I know, but you might be surprised by the features they know they want. That will help you narrow it down, as some cameras have flip screens but only shoot 720p, etc. You’re always sacrificing something so finding out what’s actually important will help you choose.
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Entry-level DSLRs deliver a big step up in image quality from a compact camera or smartphone, offering far more manual control and the ability to change lenses to tackle a huge variety of projects. Don’t worry though – there are also a host of auto modes to help you out until you’re comfortable with the more creative controls that a DSLR offers.
I’ve made contact with VLC and OPlayer, both my favourite video apps. I’ve uploaded some AVCHD sample files to both of them, see if they can make it work. And I’ve uploaded some sample MP4 files to the moderators of the Popcorn Hour Forum, to see if they can figure something out. So I’m kind of fighting a war on both sides.
Cameras on cell phones proved popular right from the start, as indicated by the J-Phone in Japan having had more than half of its subscribers using cell phone cameras in two years. The world soon followed. In 2003, more camera phones were sold worldwide than stand-alone digital cameras largely due to growth in Japan and Korea.[22] In 2005, Nokia became the world’s most sold digital camera brand. In 2006, half of the world’s mobile phones had a built-in camera.[citation needed] In 2006, Thuraya released the first satellite phone with an integrated camera. The Thuraya SG-2520 was manufactured by Korean company APSI and ran Windows CE. In 2008, Nokia sold more camera phones than Kodak sold film-based simple cameras, thus becoming the biggest manufacturer of any kind of camera.[citation needed] In 2010, the worldwide number of camera phones totaled more than a billion.[23] Since 2010, most mobile phones, even cheapest ones, are being sold with a camera. High-end camera phones usually had a relatively good lens and high resolution.
Most earlier digital camera backs used linear array sensors, moving vertically to digitize the image. Many of them only capture grayscale images. The relatively long exposure times, in the range of seconds or even minutes generally limit scan backs to studio applications, where all aspects of the photographic scene are under the photographer’s control.
Many camcorders and cameras have built-in features that are unique to the particular device. For instance, a camcorder may allow you adjust your shutter speed or field of view for shooting video. However, on a digital camera, your video option will be to simply point and shoot. Likewise, many digital cameras offer options that allow you to change the ISO (similar to changing film speeds in a traditional camera), aperture and other functions that are simply not available on their camcorder counterparts.
You may scratch your head when you see pocket cameras with fixed lenses selling for anywhere from $400 to $1,000. After all, you can get an interchangeable lens model for the same price. But these slim, premium shooters target a very specific market—photographers who already own a mirrorless camera or SLR and a bunch of lenses, but want something small as an alternative option.
Need some help to decide between an action camera, video camera, or other — I enjoy recording video of my son’s hockey games, and then producing an after season highlight video for the parents. I have been using 2 action cameras at each end of the rink, but I would like to move to a better ‘follow-the-puck’ model, as well as get the front of the goal instead of the back all the time. However, I want to actually watch as the game is live (meaning, I don’t want to have to worry about the camera or look through the view finder all the time). Any recommendations from the experts out there? Thanks in advance
so after YEARS, panasonic have FINALLY made a camcorder that beats my super old canon HF M506. Canon fitted that particular range with a HD CMOS PRO sensor, the same thing in their high end models, and as a result it gave Brilliant picture quality in low light. A few years later i tried Panasonics equivalent on price – the 770’s predecessor, and returned it back as it was worse than the canon. Canon discontinued that range and all their Legria type products since have been fitted with a crap sensor, which is why i had no reason to replace my M506. I just tried the HC V770 today, and 3 major things stand out – better picture quality in low light than my canon, the smartphone remote functionality works perfectly with my HTC One M8 (latest android version), and its lens is much wider angle than my canon (which i use with their optional wide angle attachment….clearly not wide enough). The 1 thing that sucks – Price of batteries. The canon has a bunch of alternative ‘cheapo’ batteries that work perfectly and last – i can’t seem to find ANY for the panasonic, so now i’m going to have to spend another £100 on spare batteries alone. Oh well.
I got frustrated after trying to turn things off in the settings of the V770 without any results. I decided to reboot the Popcorn Hour. And all of a sudden it was able to play the 1080/50p and 1080/28p MP4’s! There is about a second of freezing before it plays, but after that it plays smoothly.
So the next time a friend asks me which is the best digital camera for his or her trip, concert, Instagram, or food blog, I’ll simply send along a link to this article. Note that while it’s easy to pay more than a thousand bucks for a digital camera (in fact, it’s easy to pay two or three grand or more), for our purposes, we’re trying to keep this in the affordable-digital-camera range, so I’ve set $1,000 as the ceiling. If you’re looking for a camera that costs much more than that, you should probably talk to one of your professional-photographer colleagues.
I’ve spent more than 20 years reviewing tech such as video cameras at Reviewed.com, PCWorld, and a number of other other fine publications. I designed and revised most of the testing used by Reviewed.com to test products like camcorders, cameras, and a huge range of other technology and appliances.
There’s Free AVCHD to MOV in the App Store. That’s my own personal recommendation (it has an almost perfect rating). However, you can change the settings to record in MP4 in the Panasonic camcorder. That might be the easiest way to bypass converting all together.