camera error | samsung camera

The smaller the f/number, the larger the effective aperture. The present system of f/numbers to give the effective aperture of a lens was standardized by an international convention in 1963 and is referred to as the British Standard (BS-1013).[57] Other aperture measurement scales had been used through the early 20th century, including the European Scale, Intermediate settings, and the 1881 Uniform System proposed by the Royal Photographic Society, which are all now largely obsolete.[58]:30 T-stops have been used for color motion picture lenses, to account for differences in light transmission through compound lenses, are calculated as T-number = f/number x √transmittance.[58]:615
Camcorders are used in the production of low-budget TV shows if the production crew does not have access to more expensive equipment. Movies have been shot entirely on consumer camcorder equipment (such as The Blair Witch Project, 28 Days Later and Paranormal Activity). Academic filmmaking programs have also switched from 16mm film to digital video in early 2010s, due to the reduced expense and ease of editing of digital media and the increasing scarcity of film stock and equipment. Some camcorder manufacturers cater to this market; Canon and Panasonic support 24p (24 fps, progressive scan—the same frame rate as cinema film) video in some high-end models for easy film conversion.
What would you recommend for kid portrait, kid action and low light pictures? I am an amateur mom who loves taking picture of my kids. I have currently now Canon Rebel xsi but it is terrible in low light. Wanting to upgrade a better one but not spending thousand.
I’m about to buy the V770, but I’m not sure what memory card I should get with it, specifically the amount of memory. I’ll be using it for recording two-week holidays, after which I’ll empty the memory again. It’s probably not right to compare it to my old ’07 camera because the file size will probably be much larger with today’s higher resolution, right? So what memory card would you recommend?
Canon announced the followup to its R600 with the unsurprisingly named R700 ($300, shipping in February). The R600 was essentially identical to the R500 that preceded it, and the R700 seems extremely similar, too. It appears to have the same design, sensor, and lens as its two predecessors, with the addition of a brighter LCD screen and a new UI. One notable improvement is that the video camera will come bundled with the higher capacity BP-727, which can give you up to an extra 55 minutes of recording time, and goes for $80 on its own. Canon also updated the R70 and R72 along similar lines from the R50/R60, and R52/R62, including built-in storage and connectivity as improvement over the base model.
The very large sensor these backs use leads to enormous image sizes. For example, Phase One’s P45 39 MP image back creates a single TIFF image of size up to 224.6 MB, and even greater pixel counts are available. Medium format digitals such as this are geared more towards studio and portrait photography than their smaller DSLR counterparts; the ISO speed in particular tends to have a maximum of 400, versus 6400 for some DSLR cameras. (Canon EOS-1D Mark IV and Nikon D3S have ISO 12800 plus Hi-3 ISO 102400 with the Canon EOS-1Dx’s ISO of 204800)
Unfortunately, I hate to admit this, but I might have lead you slightly astray. While a review from a source I trust says that you can in fact do this (http://www.imaging-resource.com/cameras/sony/rx100-iii/vs/canon/g7x/ ), a number of people have reported that this function was available in the RX100 I and the RX100 II, but not in the RX100 III.
If you want to take only one or two photographs, all of this can be a bit of a nuisance. Most people have found themselves wasting photographs simply to “finish off the film.” Often, you have to wait several days for your film to be developed and your prints (the finished photographs) returned to you. It’s no wonder that digital photography has become very popular—because it solves all these problems at a stroke.
I too have been an avid Fitbit user. I’ve owned the Flex, Force, and Surge, but needed to return all of them, for various reasons. i want to get the Charge HR next, but there are known compatibility issues with devices running Android Lollipop, listed on Fitbit’s website. I just can’t bring myself to continue being loyal to Fitbit, if their devices continue to be troublesome…
One other option, though it’s a really tricky one, is to hack a camera. CHDK is a homebrew firmware that you can load on many Canon compact cameras that will give you access to a great many more features, and may allow you to work around the 30 minute limit
What’s your opinion on filming in 720p? Is it a “waste” of the potential of the HC-V770? Or is it a pretty good format for recording? I’ve read that people prefer 720p over 1080i. And while 1080p is available (AVCHD) for the V770, it’s a bit too much for the Popcorn Hour C200 as well.
A video camera represents the best of many worlds when it comes to recording video. It’ll give you video quality and a zoom that a smartphone can’t match. It is easier to use and able to record longer footage than other camera types, and it has better built-in sound than a DSLR (more on this later). If you’re planning on shooting a whole day of video, a video camera is designed to be comfortable to hold for extended bouts of filming.
Olympus Air lens camera, announced in 2014 and released in 2015, the lens camera is open platform using Android (operating system) and can detach into 2 parts (sensor part and lens part) and all Micro Four Thirds System lenses can be attached to sensor part of the lens camera.[36][37]
A DSLR is still the cheapest way to get a camera with interchangeable lenses and a viewfinder (you’ll find entry-level mirrorless cameras don’t have viewfinders) and, at the other end of the scale, almost all professional sports, press and wildlife photographers choose full-frame DSLRs over every other camera type. 
Film SLRs have advantages and can be far more durable and resistant to extreme environments. They require much less care and batteries last for years. Some do not even need batteries to operate, although you loose metering and autofocus obviously. They are not prone to sensor-dust (or film-dust) because a new frame is used for each shot.
“Hey,” you may say, “why do I need a video camera? I’ve got a cell phone that takes video!” That’s a fair point: for casual shooting a cell phone is fine. But cell phone video is all about limitations: A decent video camera does things that no cell phone or tablet can do.
I bought a pair of these and have no issues with sound. However, the trick is to plug in an external mic. I picked up a Shure PG-58 dynamic cardioid for under $100 and an XLR to 3.5mm adapter and get awesome, hiss-free audio. I use Audacity to open up the sound files directly and edit the sound at will. On-camera mics never sound good regardless of the quality because they’re simply too far from the talent.
For our hands on testing in 2014, we were left with three contenders: the $310 Canon Vixia HF R500, the $600 Panasonic HC-V750K and the $290 Sony Handycam HDR-CX330. We borrowed or bought these models to put through a series of tests. Since then, both Canon and Panasonic have replaced these units with newer ones, but that are all but identical from what we can tell, except for maybe some minor new shooting settings and a new model number. The Canon Vixia HF R500 was replaced with the Canon VIXIA HF R600, the Panasonic HC-V770K followed the V750K. Both of these models have the same sensor and internals as their predecessors, so we’re comfortable basing their performance on older models.
Another way to activate a laptop web camera is to start using it through an instant messenger service like Skype, Yahoo, MSN or Google Talk. These applications support video chat and should open up the webcam automatically once you start using them.
Most digital cameras save both video and photos onto memory cards. Those memory cards will have a maximum storage capacity of a few GB (gigabytes), which is only enough to hold a small amount of video. On the other hand, a hard-drive digital camcorder can have a built-in hard drive of 160+ GB, making it possible for hold substantially more video at a time than its still camera counterparts.
Closed-circuit television (CCTV) generally use pan tilt zoom cameras (PTZ), for security, surveillance, and/or monitoring purposes. Such cameras are designed to be small, easily hidden, and able to operate unattended; those used in industrial or scientific settings are often meant for use in environments that are normally inaccessible or uncomfortable for humans, and are therefore hardened for such hostile environments (e.g. radiation, high heat, or toxic chemical exposure).
A few 35 mm cameras have had digital camera backs made by their manufacturer, Leica being a notable example. Medium format and large format cameras (those using film stock greater than 35 mm), have a low unit production, and typical digital backs for them cost over $10,000. These cameras also tend to be highly modular, with handgrips, film backs, winders, and lenses available separately to fit various needs.
Since 2006, nearly all camcorders sold are digital. Tape-based (MiniDV/HDV) camcorders are no longer popular, since tapeless models (with an SD card or internal SSD) cost almost the same but offer greater convenience; video captured on an SD card can be transferred to a computer faster than digital tape. None of the consumer-class camcorders announced at the 2006 International Consumer Electronics Show recorded on tape.[1]
Rangefinder cameras allow the distance to objects to be measured by means of a coupled parallax unit on top of the camera, allowing the focus to be set with accuracy. Single-lens reflex cameras allow the photographer to determine the focus and composition visually using the objective lens and a moving mirror to project the image onto a ground glass or plastic micro-prism screen. Twin-lens reflex cameras use an objective lens and a focusing lens unit (usually identical to the objective lens.) in a parallel body for composition and focusing. View cameras use a ground glass screen which is removed and replaced by either a photographic plate or a reusable holder containing sheet film before exposure. Modern cameras often offer autofocus systems to focus the camera automatically by a variety of methods.[53]
Along the way we’ll explain some of the jargon and the differences between cameras, though if you need a bit more help deciding what kind of camera you need, you can get a lot more information from our special step-by-step guide: What camera should I buy?
http://all-the-best-info.com/cameras/dslr-camera/camera-quotes-best-small-camera.html

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After a big dip of sales in 2012, consumer digital camera sales declined again in 2013 by 36 percent. In 2011, compact digital cameras sold 10 million per month. In 2013, sales fell to about 4 million per month. DSLR and MILC sales also declined in 2013 by 10–15% after almost ten years of double digit growth.[46] Worldwide unit sales of digital cameras is continuously declining from 148 million in 2011 to 58 million in 2015 and tends to decrease more in the following years.[47]
When shopping for a starter camera, ask yourself some questions about what you want. Take a look at the size, as a camera isn’t any good if you’re not going to use it. But also think about connectivity—you probably want to copy images to your smartphone easily—and price. Ease of use isn’t a huge hurdle these days—everything has an auto mode—but models with guided interfaces will let you take some sort of control over how your photos turn out, without having to know too much technical jargon.
Sensor: APS-C CMOS | Megapixels: 18MP | Lens mount: Canon EF-S | Screen: 3-inch articulating touchscreen, 1,040,000 dots | Continuous shooting speed: 5fps | Max video resolution: 1080p | User level: Beginner
Ultimately, digital cameras and camcorders are built for the particular jobs they are meant to do. Camcorders are designed to be held aloft and steady for longer periods of time. While cameras are not. Camcorder LCD displays can be rotated to give you a multitude of angles. Most still cameras have fixed displays that can’t be moved. And the body design of both devices is made for the optimal experience while using each specific device.
As of January 2017, the only major manufacturer to announce new consumer camcorders at CES (Consumer Electronic Show) in Las Vegas was Canon with its entry-level HD models. Panasonic only announced details regarding their Mirrorless Micro Four Thirds Digital Camera called the LUMIX GH5, capable of shooting 4K in 60p. This is the first time in decades that Panasonic & Sony haven’t announced new traditional camcorders at CES, & instead carried over 2016’s models, such as Sony’s FDR-AX53. This is due to there being far less demand in the market for traditional camcorders as more & more consumers prefer to record video with their 4K-capable smartphones, DSLRs, and action cameras from GoPro, Xiaomi, Sony, Nikon, and many others.
In 2000, Sharp introduced the world’s first digital camera phone, the J-SH04 J-Phone, in Japan.[50] By the mid-2000s, higher-end cell phones had an integrated digital camera. By the beginning of the 2010s, almost all smartphones had an integrated digital camera.
The $600 Panasonic HC-V770K is the best video camera for those who want a bit more than what their smartphone or even DSLR has to offer. Also referred to as a camcorder, this video camera was proved best after 30 hours of research and testing, which included interviewing experts and shooting hours of video in a huge range of conditions. The HC-V770K captures video that has more detail, better color, and better sound than the footage from all the cameras we tested (or any camera up to twice its price). In our tests, it produced the sharpest footage in bright light, plus it had the best stabilization and the least noise in low light. It also features the best touchscreen controls of the bunch and, with a long 20x optical zoom, you can capture the action from across a huge space—try to do that with a smartphone.
That’s the middle ground that we looked for here: video cameras that offer better quality and a wider range of features than smartphones but don’t require that you spend a fortune. Our research revealed that camcorders ranged from $300 up to about $900. Above that are the professional and serious user models that offer features like 4K shooting, but are more complicated than what most people need. Go much cheaper than $300, and you start to lose out on video quality—especially in low light.
A digital camera (or digicam) is a camera that encodes digital images and videos digitally and stores them for later reproduction.[61] Most cameras sold today are digital,[62] and digital cameras are incorporated into many devices ranging from mobile phones (called camera phones) to vehicles.
You’re ready to go live and broadcast to your friends or family through your laptop’s inbuilt webcam . There’s just one thing getting in the way of your web chat – you can’t turn the camera on! Here’s how you can activate it. It should only take a few minutes.
Jump up ^ Wagner, D.; Reitmayr, G; Mulloni, A; Drummond, T; Schmalstieg, D (2008). “Pose Tracking from Natural Features on Mobile Phones” (PDF). Proceedings of the Symposium on Mixed and Augmented Reality. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2009-06-12.
For some reason I thought it had an external battery charger where you’d take out the battery and plug it in to charge, rather than charging the battery in-camera. My mistake! Looks like the AC adapter should come in the box, and if not, it looks like it’s just a USB charger anyhow.
Released in 2014, the D810 is Nikon’s top of the line full frame camera and it is a sound option for beginners who are wanting something powerful and looking to learn. This camera directly competes with Canon’s exceptional 5D Mark III — and in some ways it wins. The autofocus on the D810 works great, even in the dark, and it handles high ISOs exceptionally well. It is highly capable at shooting portraits, sports, landscapes, and just about anything you throw its way.
Political protesters use camcorders to film what they believe unjust. Animal rights protesters who break into factory farms and animal testing labs use camcorders to film the conditions in which the animals are living. Anti-hunting protesters film fox hunts. People investigating political crimes use surveillance cameras for evidence-gathering. Activist videos often appear on Indymedia.
A camera phone is a smartphone which is able to capture photographs and often record video using one or more built-in digital cameras. The first camera phone was sold in 2000 in Japan, a Sharp J-SH04 J-Phone model, although some argue that the SCH-V200 and Kyocera VP-210 Visual Phone, both introduced months earlier in South Korea and Japan respectively, are the first camera phones.[1]
Video quality in bright light is one of the easiest tests for a camcorder to pass—when it’s sunny out, capturing detail sharply is a no brainer. But specifically, the Panasonic had deep, saturated colors and sharp detail, so that when you’re recording a birthday party, every color on the piñata will pop and every piece of crêpe paper can be made out.
It turns out my Canon has a CMOS sensor (HD pro) which was fitted to the higher end G models in the range, which is why its such a brilliant performer. Canon have since replaced it with the HF R506 this year, which they have fitted with a Worse, smaller CMOS sensor – presumably to distance it from their higher end G range and not make the same mistake.
Another reason to go for the big sensor is to minimize image noise. A 24MP DSLR has much larger pixels than a point-and-shoot of the same resolution. These larger pixels allow the sensor to be set at a higher sensitivity, measured numerically as ISO, without creating as much image noise. An advantage to the larger surface area is that changes in color or brightness are more gradual than that of a point-and-shoot. This allows more natural-looking images with a greater sense of depth.
Overlooked factor is the angle camera shoots. You need that for selfies but makes forward shooting much more pleasant too. Here the Canon does poorly and I am thinking about switching from Canon to Panasonic because of that.
Maybe the best camera for you is an action camera, designed to attach to helmets, surfboards, cars and bikes, for instance, to chronicle point of view adventures. GoPro and Sony make some of the more popular action cameras available.
Unfortunately, as for the video bitrate, I don’t really know enough to make a hard call. I’m betting 24 Mbps will be just fine and keep in mind that you can always convert it to a lower bitrate, but not the other way around. I believe (though I could be wrong) that the 35 Mbps is linked to shooting at 60p, where 24 Mbps is at 24p. 60p will have much smoother motion, but 24p is more “cinematic” and generally how we’re used to seeing movies and TV shot. So video shot at 60p sometimes looks a bit “off” if you’re not used to it.
Also the fact that you can buy really cheap after market batteries for the Canon which work fine (but just dont give info about battery life left on screen), but I cannot find any equivalent cheap battery alternative for the Panasonic.
Endless possibilities. If you know you are the type of person who really gets into your hobbies, you may as well start with a camera that will let you do everything. A good entry-level DSLR will give you the ability to shoot in manual mode, provide decent low-light performance, and have an endless array of lenses to choose from. And the good news is that the DSLRs that are designed for newbies offer a lot of automatic and semi-automatic modes that make shooting a breeze.