camera reviews | used cameras

The death of photography: are camera phones destroying an artform? by Stuart Jeffries. The Guardian, 13 December 2013. Is the sheer quantity of photos we’re now taking spoiling their quality—and the quality of the moments we’re recording?
Big physical size and small sensor allow superzoom and wide aperture. Bridgcams generally include an image stabilization system to enable longer handheld exposures, sometimes better than DSLR for low light condition.
The Flip Video was a series of tapeless camcorders introduced by Pure Digital Technologies in 2006. Slightly larger than a smartphone, the Flip Video was a basic camcorder with record, zoom, playback and browse buttons and a USB jack for uploading video. The original models recorded at a 640×480-pixel resolution; later models featured HD recording at 1280×720 pixels. The Mino was a smaller Flip Video, with the same features as the standard model. The Mino was the smallest of all camcorders, slightly wider than a MiniDV cassette and smaller than most smartphones on the market. In fact the Mino was small enough to fit inside the shell of a VHS cassette. Later HD models featured larger screens. In 2011, the Flip Video (more recently manufactured by Cisco) was discontinued.[14]
Step back a decade and there was no comparison at all between the rough and clunky snapshot cameras on cellphones and even the most mediocre compact digital cameras. While the digitals were boasting ever-increasing numbers of megapixels, cellphones took crude snaps little better than the ones you could get from a basic webcam (1 megapixel or less was common). Now all that’s changed. The Canon Ixus/Powershot digital camera I use routinely is rated at 7.1 megapixels, which is perfectly fine for almost anything I ever want to do. My new LG smartphone comes in at 13 megapixels, which (theoretically, at least) sounds like it must be twice as good.
Image sensor: This is the light-detecting microchip in a digital camera and it uses either CCD or CMOS technology. You can’t actually see the chip in this photo, because it’s directly underneath the lens. But you can see what it looks like in our article on webcams.
This isn’t quite the end of the process, however. When the film is full, you have to take it to a drugstore (chemist’s) to have it developed. Usually, this involves placing the film into a huge automated developing machine. The machine opens up the film container, pulls out the film, and dips it in various other chemicals to make your photos appear. This process turns the film into a series of “negative” pictures—ghostly reverse versions of what you actually saw. In a negative, the black areas look light and vice-versa and all the colors look weird too because the negative stores them as their opposites. Once the machine has made the negatives, it uses them to make prints (finished versions) of your photos.
On November 17, 2006, during a performance at the Laugh Factory comedy club, comedian Michael Richards was recorded responding to hecklers with racial slurs by a member of the audience using a camera phone. The video was widely circulated in television and internet news broadcasts.
I stumbled across your site when researching camcorders, and I’m just checking in to see if you expect to post an update in the next few weeks. We need to make this purchase for a work project, so I expect we won’t delay too much longer. Thanks.
Many incorporate a retractable lens assembly that provides optical zoom. In most models, an auto actuating lens cover protects the lens from elements. Most ruggedized or water-resistant models do not retract, and most with superzoom capability do not retract fully.
Pro photographers are almost always shooting Canon or Nikon SLR systems, but there are some very capable alternatives out there. There are reasons that you see most working photographers using one of the two most popular systems—they include a solid bevy of pro-grade bodies and lenses, a strong support system backing that equipment, and the comfort that years of use brings. That’s not to say you can’t go another way. Sony makes a pro-level SLR and a few mirrorless cameras that fit the bill.
For example, f/8 at 8 ms (1/125 of a second) and f/5.6 at 4 ms (1/250 of a second) yield the same amount of light. The chosen combination affects the final result. The aperture and focal length of the lens determine the depth of field, which refers to the range of distances from the lens that will be in focus. A longer lens or a wider aperture will result in “shallow” depth of field (i.e., only a small plane of the image will be in sharp focus). This is often useful for isolating subjects from backgrounds as in individual portraits or macro photography.
Thanks for the tip about the Camera icon. I actually did not have that problem, but I have found since upgrading my iPhone and iPad that something has changed with my ‘Keyboard’ behavior. I used to get suggested words as I typed along… and they are not there anymore. They would appear in a bar above the keyboard window. It is very frustrating to lose that wonderful feature. I was very used to having it and using it.
As a network-connected device, megapixel camera phones are playing significant roles in crime prevention, journalism and business applications as well as individual uses. They can also be used for activities such as voyeurism, invasion of privacy, and copyright infringement. Because they can be used to share media almost immediately, they are a potent personal content creation tool. On January 17, 2007, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced a plan to encourage people to use their camera-phones to capture crimes happening in progress or dangerous situations and send them to emergency responders. Through the program, people will be able to send their images or video directly to 911.[32] Camera phones have also been used to discreetly take photographs in museums, performance halls, and other places where photography is prohibited. However, as sharing can be instantaneous, even if the action is discovered, it is too late, as the image is already out of reach, unlike a photo taken by a digital camera that only stores images locally for later transfer (however, as the newer digital cameras support Wi-Fi, a photographer can perform photography with a DSLR and instantly post the photo on the internet through the mobile phone’s Wi-Fi and 3G capabilities).
Sensor Size Full-Frame (24 x 36mm) mm Full-Frame (24 x 36mm) mm Full-Frame (35.9 x 23.9mm) APS-C (15.7 x 23.7mm) mm Full-Frame (35.9 x 24mm) APS-C (23.5 x 15.6mm) mm APS-C (22.3 x 14.9mm) APS-C (22.5 x 15mm) APS-C (23.2 x 15.4mm) mm APS-C (23.5 x 15.6mm) mm
Many cameras and digital camcorders use AVCHD and MP4 to store recorded videos. While AVCHD videos offer high quality and high resolution, AVCHD as a file format is not as widely supported as MP4 and other popular video formats. To upload your videos to YouTube and other websites or to edit them using editing software, you may need to convert AVCHD files to MP4. iFunia Video Converter for Mac can work as a powerful AVCHD converter. It supports tons of input and output formats. Using it, you can easily convert AVCHD videos to MP4 or other desired video/audio formats on Mac with ease and quality.
Within a decade of being introduced in America, 3 general forms of camera were in popular use: the American- or chamfered-box camera, the Robert’s-type camera or “Boston box”, and the Lewis-type camera. The American-box camera had beveled edges at the front and rear, and an opening in the rear where the formed image could be viewed on ground glass. The top of the camera had hinged doors for placing photographic plates. Inside there was one available slot for distant objects, and another slot in the back for close-ups. The lens was focused either by sliding or with a rack and pinion mechanism. The Robert’s-type cameras were similar to the American-box, except for having a knob-fronted worm gear on the front of the camera, which moved the back box for focusing. Many Robert’s-type cameras allowed focusing directly on the lens mount. The third popular daguerreotype camera in America was the Lewis-type, introduced in 1851, which utilized a bellows for focusing. The main body of the Lewis-type camera was mounted on the front box, but the rear section was slotted into the bed for easy sliding. Once focused, a set screw was tightened to hold the rear section in place.[35] Having the bellows in the middle of the body facilitated making a second, in-camera copy of the original image.[36]
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Nikon has taken its flagship D5 DSLR and most of its high-end features and distilled all of this into a smaller, but still very durable metal body. The full-frame sensor is replaced by an 20.9MP APS-C sized chip that allows the D500 to shoot at a rapid 10fps and deliver a great high ISO performance. A brilliant all-rounder with a brilliant 153-point AF system means it excels at fast action like sports and wildlife photography, but still has the chops to shoot landscapes and portraits. If the cost is a bit steep, then take a look at the D7500. It sits below the D500 and inherits many of its tech, including the 20.9MP sensor.
1) Opt.Zoom 20x. This is optical zoom, where the others are digital zooms. They “increase” the zoom by essentially blowing up the the image, so it looks bigger. It leads to a dramatic drop in video quality, so keep it on optical (Opt.) mode.
There are also a number of add-on camera modules for smartphones called lens-style cameras (lens camera). They contain all components of a digital camera in a module, but lack a viewfinder, display and most of the controls. Instead they can be mounted to a smartphone and use its display and controls. Lens-style cameras include:
Our final camera is a ‘bridge’ camera, a type of camera that we don’t normally like very much because the ultra-zoom design forces the makers to use titchy 1/2.3-inch sensors the same size as those in point-and-shoot cameras. You get the look and feel of a DSLR, but you certainly don’t get the image quality. But the Panasonic Lumix FZ2000 (known as the FZ2500 in the US) is different. It sacrifices a huge zoom range in favour of a much larger 1.0-inch sensor – a compromise most serious photographers will applaud. While the zoom tops out at 480mm equivalent, which is relatively short for a bridge camera, that’s still plenty for all but the most extreme everyday use. We’d certainly sacrifice a little for of zoom range for better and faster optics. We love the FZ2000 because it delivers both image quality and zoom range, while also offering full manual and semi-manual controls, the ability to shoot raw files and 4K video.
I lost my camera also yesterday. I was trying to avoid an update because I was busy at the moment. I realized later my camera icon was missing. I have tried unrestricting it, looked for hidden icons and reset the homepage but nothing worked.
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Some bridge cameras have a lens thread to attach accessories such as wide-angle or telephoto converters as well as filters such as UV or Circular Polarizing filter and lens hoods. The scene is composed by viewing the display or the electronic viewfinder (EVF). Most have a slightly longer shutter lag than a DSLR. Many of these cameras can store images in a raw format in addition to supporting JPEG.[25] The majority have a built-in flash, but only a few have a hotshoe.
So I’ve come to this blog posting about 5 times already. I haven’t purchased a camera in almost 6 years. My current camera is the Canon rebel t2i (yes, very old). I am looking to start making youtube tutorials that won’t really be showing myself, but more so my hands, some the things I will be teaching to make. I am trying to find the perfect camera to use. I need something where I can control it with a wireless remote (stop, start, zoom, etc). I also need one that will auto focus quickly when I bring something close to the camera and take it away. I am clueless as to what to buy. I am going to be shooting tutorials on knitting/crochet. I currently own a yarn store and I also make my own hand dyed yarn. Making youtube tutorials has been something I have been wanting to do for a long time now. Can I please bother you for some advice? What camera do you recommend for me? I would like to keep it in the reasonable pricing area. Nothing more then 3000 and I am actually looking to spend that much on everything if I could. As far as lighting, wireless remote, etc. goes.
Although the idea for a digital camera originated in 1961, the technology to create one didn’t exist. The first digital camera was invented in 1975 by Steven Sasson, an engineer at Eastman Kodak. It primarily used a charged-coupled device, a type of image sensor, but originally used a camera tube for image capture. That functionality was later digitized by Kodak. The first digital cameras were used by the military and for scientific purposes. Medical businesses and News reporting companies began to use digital cameras a few years later.
The earliest video cameras were those of John Logie Baird, based on the mechanical Nipkow disk and used in experimental broadcasts through the 1918s-1930s. All-electronic designs based on the video camera tube, such as Vladimir Zworykin’s Iconoscope and Philo Farnsworth’s image dissector, supplanted the Baird system by the 1930s. These remained in wide use until the 1980s, when cameras based on solid-state image sensors such as CCDs (and later CMOS active pixel sensors) eliminated common problems with tube technologies such as image burn-in and made digital video workflow practical. The transition to digital TV gave a boost to digital video cameras and by the 2010s, most video cameras were digital.
Another reason to go for the big sensor is to minimize image noise. A 24MP DSLR has much larger pixels than a point-and-shoot of the same resolution. These larger pixels allow the sensor to be set at a higher sensitivity, measured numerically as ISO, without creating as much image noise. An advantage to the larger surface area is that changes in color or brightness are more gradual than that of a point-and-shoot. This allows more natural-looking images with a greater sense of depth.
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I grew up taking pictures and making videos, I went to film school, and I’ve kept on snapping away in the years after graduation, taking pictures for articles I’m writing, to record my travels, or to document the early years of my children’s lives. After decades of taking photos, I’ve now whittled my collection of digital cameras to just a few: I currently own a Nikon DSLR, a Canon bridge camera, a Nikon CoolPix compact point-and-shoot, and a bunch of older models, most of which are slowly being destroyed by my 4-year-old son. (Also, there’s the phone in my pocket, of course.) That doesn’t mean, though, that those are the only good ones out there.
Some cameras have post focusing. Post focusing means take the pictures first and then focusing later at the personal computer. The camera uses many tiny lenses on the sensor to capture light from every camera angle of a scene and is called plenoptics technology. A current plenoptic camera design has 40,000 lenses working together to grab the optimal picture.[54]