camera electronic | camera decision

B&H Photo has been a staple in the photography and videography businesses since it was founded in 1973. Though we service more industries today, cameras remain the lifeblood of our business. We sell a wide variety of digital cameras from all the top brands like Canon, Nikon, Sony, Panasonic, Olympus, Fujifilm, Pentax, Leica, Samsung, and more. Digital camera types include Digital SLR cameras (DSLR), Mirrorless System cameras, Point-and-Shoot cameras, Medium Format cameras, and more. Read below to find out which camera type best suits your needs.
Type: High-end compact | Sensor: APS-C CMOS | Resolution: 24.3MP | Lens: 23mm f/2 | Screen type: 3-inch, 1,040,000 dots | Viewfinder: Hybrid | Maximum continuous shooting speed: 8fps | Movies: 1080p | User level: Expert
It turns out my Canon has a CMOS sensor (HD pro) which was fitted to the higher end G models in the range, which is why its such a brilliant performer. Canon have since replaced it with the HF R506 this year, which they have fitted with a Worse, smaller CMOS sensor – presumably to distance it from their higher end G range and not make the same mistake.
The Canon 80D would be sufficient, certainly. It sounds like you are trying to fit a lot into the frame, so a wide angle lens is needed. What I would think about next is lighting. Unless you have really good natural light in your office, I’d consider this: https://www.borrowlenses.com/product/FotodioX-C-318RLS-Flapjack-BiColor-LED-Ring-Light-Kit
Digital single-lens reflex cameras (DSLR) use a reflex mirror that can reflect the light and also can swivel from one position to another position and back to initial position. By default, the reflex mirror is set 45 degree from horizontal, blocks the light to the sensor and reflects light from the lens to penta-mirror/prism at the DSLR camera and after some reflections arrives at the viewfinder. The reflex mirror is pulled out horizontally below the penta-mirror/prism when shutter release is fully pressed, so the viewfinder will be dark and the light/image can directly strike the sensor at the time of exposure (speed setting).
If you’re comfortable with spending above $1,000 then nearly any interchangeable lens DSLR or mirrorless camera will do the trick. When reading reviews/stats, you’ll want to pay attention to a couple of things: Does it have a mic port? Does it have a hot shoe for accessories and mics? How high is the maximum ISO? What are the clip length limitations (are you going to be shooting long scenes or editing together shorter ones)? These questions will help you narrow down your choices.
I love Panasonic products and this is rather frustrating. Video from the 770 plays nicely from the camcorder itself when plugged into a TV and on computer using Windows movie player. However the background white noise is very noticeable. The 770’s predecessor the 750 (which I sold) had very poor audio in all respects and most likely Panasonic somehow pumped up the cameras amplification. Bad Panasonic!!! Just fix the problem and stop trying to put a band-aid on it.
If you’re buying your first DSLR, it makes sense to buy it as a kit, which generally includes the camera body along with an 18-55mm lens. Often referred to as a ‘kit’ lens, this covers a pretty broad zoom range, perfect for everything from landscapes to portraits, but that’s just the start. 
so after YEARS, panasonic have FINALLY made a camcorder that beats my super old canon HF M506. Canon fitted that particular range with a HD CMOS PRO sensor, the same thing in their high end models, and as a result it gave Brilliant picture quality in low light. A few years later i tried Panasonics equivalent on price – the 770’s predecessor, and returned it back as it was worse than the canon. Canon discontinued that range and all their Legria type products since have been fitted with a crap sensor, which is why i had no reason to replace my M506. I just tried the HC V770 today, and 3 major things stand out – better picture quality in low light than my canon, the smartphone remote functionality works perfectly with my HTC One M8 (latest android version), and its lens is much wider angle than my canon (which i use with their optional wide angle attachment….clearly not wide enough). The 1 thing that sucks – Price of batteries. The canon has a bunch of alternative ‘cheapo’ batteries that work perfectly and last – i can’t seem to find ANY for the panasonic, so now i’m going to have to spend another £100 on spare batteries alone. Oh well.
Digital and film cameras share an optical system, typically using a lens with a variable diaphragm to focus light onto an image pickup device.[63] The diaphragm and shutter admit the correct amount of light to the imager, just as with film but the image pickup device is electronic rather than chemical. However, unlike film cameras, digital cameras can display images on a screen immediately after being recorded, and store and delete images from memory. Most digital cameras can also record moving videos with sound. Some digital cameras can crop and stitch pictures and perform other elementary image editing.
A common alternative is the use of a card reader which may be capable of reading several types of storage media, as well as high speed transfer of data to the computer. Use of a card reader also avoids draining the camera battery during the download process. An external card reader allows convenient direct access to the images on a collection of storage media. But if only one storage card is in use, moving it back and forth between the camera and the reader can be inconvenient. Many computers have a card reader built in, at least for SD cards.
Common values for field of view crop in DSLRs using active pixel sensors include 1.3x for some Canon (APS-H) sensors, 1.5x for Sony APS-C sensors used by Nikon, Pentax and Konica Minolta and for Fujifilm sensors, 1.6 (APS-C) for most Canon sensors, ~1.7x for Sigma’s Foveon sensors and 2x for Kodak and Panasonic 4/3-inch sensors currently used by Olympus and Panasonic. Crop factors for non-SLR consumer compact and bridge cameras are larger, frequently 4x or more.
Photo: An old-style film camera from the late 1980s. The film loads in a spool on the right and winds across to another spool on the left, passing in front of the lens on the way. When you take a photo, the shutter lets light enter from the lens and expose the film. It’s all very 19th-century compared to digital photography!
These cameras have much larger sensors than the other types, typically 18 mm to 36 mm on the diagonal (crop factor 2, 1.6, or 1). The larger sensor permits more light to be received by each pixel; this, combined with the relatively large lenses provides superior low-light performance. For the same field of view and the same aperture, a larger sensor gives shallower focus. They use interchangeable lenses for versatility. Usually some lenses are made for digital SLR use only, but recent trend the lenses can also be used in detachable lens video camera with or without adapter.
Most first-time DSLR users aren’t going to purchase a whole bevy of lenses, but there are a few to consider to supplement the kit lens that ships with the camera. The first is a telezoom to complement the standard 18-55mm lens. There is usually a matching zoom, starting at 55mm and ranging up to 200mm or 300mm, that will help you get tighter shots of distant action. Plan on budgeting $200-300 for this lens.
The biggest benefit of a DSLR over some other types of cameras is the ability to change lenses based on your shooting environment. Best Buy has a wide selection of DSLR lenses for every type of shot you’ll want to take. A powerful telephoto lens gets you up close and personal to wildlife or sporting events. Macro lenses bring out the detail in extreme close-up shots. Prime lenses are a must-have for anyone interested in portrait photography. These lenses deliver outstanding focus on your subject while creating a professional-looking blurred background. You can also find great choices that help you develop your artistic flare, including wide-angle lenses, and fisheye lenses. Whatever the event, environment or style of photography, add the DSLR lens to make the memory perfect.
The choice between an optical or electronic viewfinder is another one to consider. Modern EVFs are really, really good, and refresh quickly enough so you can track moving action. If you haven’t used one in a few years, you’ll be surprised at how far they’ve come. But for some photographers there’s no substitute for an optical viewfinder, in which case an SLR will be preferred to mirrorless.
Hi! I have been thinking on making videos for a long time now and I want to be one that is not delicate, that has nice pixels and that is active since I am the time of person wanting to share the stuff I can do (flips,handstands,skateboarding,rollerblading,etc) and I want a good camera aswell and that is cheap so that we can afford it! But anyway amazing website helps a lot!
I agree….It should be a “No brainer”. However even with my Rode Pro mic the 770 sound level when imported into an editor is almost flat lined and requires an artificial boost. Same in Camtasia and Adobe.
A camera is an optical instrument for recording or capturing images, which may be stored locally, transmitted to another location, or both. The images may be individual still photographs or sequences of images constituting videos or movies. The camera is a remote sensing device as it senses subjects without any contact . The word camera comes from camera obscura, which means “dark chamber” and is the Latin name of the original device for projecting an image of external reality onto a flat surface. The modern photographic camera evolved from the camera obscura. The functioning of the camera is very similar to the functioning of the human eye. The first permanent photograph was made in 1826 by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce.
Of course, the autofocus system has to be able to keep up with the frame rate. Basic DSLRs often only have a few autofocus points, which makes it difficult to track moving subjects. High-end models sport autofocus points that cover most of the frame, making them favorites of photographers interested in capturing sports action and wildlife. Continuous shooting and autofocus performance go hand-in-hand, so it is important to look for a camera that does both well.
We aren’t the only ones who rated the Panasonic as a top pick. Reviewed.com gave the Panasonic HC-W850 (which is identical to the HC-V770K but from last year with a second, rear-facing camera that lets you record your own face while you shoot normally through the front camera) a rating of 9.1 out of 10, putting it in third place in their camcorder chart.
In the meantime, here are some little beauties to get you started. While these cameras lack many of the features of those further down the list (like the ability to use manual mode, change lenses, see yourself in a flip screen, or shoot in high res) their ease of use and small price tags make them great for getting started.
Cheaper than the D500 and while it doesn’t offer quite the same pro-spec performance, the Nikon D7500 packs in the same excellent 20.9MP sensor, but in an even more compact and affordable body. The new camera may not get the 153-point AF system from the D500, but the enhanced 51-point system in the D7500 still puts a lot of rival systems in the shade, while the 4K video capture, tilt-angle touchscreen display and 8fps burst shooting are some of the highlights. The D7500 is bound to be a tempting prospect for both new and existing users. Alternatively, take a look at the 24.2MP D7200 – it may have been surpassed by the D7500, but it’s still one of the best enthusiast DSLRs out there.
I think that the Canon camera will be more than adequate for your needs. If the built in audio isn’t quite good enough, you can buy an external microphone and connect it to the Canon through the external mic jack. If you are simply talking to your audience, a $25 lav microphone should be good enough.
http://all-the-best-info.com/cameras/camera/camera-quotes-top-digital-cameras.html

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If you want a great digital camera that more than meets the needs of the amateur-but-dedicated photographer, then the Sony Alpha A6000 Mirrorless Digital Camera is the way to go. This device works great in the bright light of day or the lower light of evening or interiors, it has a high-quality 24-megapixel sensor, a lens with zoom range between 16 and 50 millimeters, and superfast autofocus abilities, so you don’t miss the moment. You can also use your smartphone as a remote control, allowing for the ultimate selfies, no selfie stick required. And now for your quick Photography 101 lesson: This camera is called “mirrorless” because when you use the viewfinder, you are seeing a digital re-creation of what the sensor is seeing through the lens (a.k.a. the image to be captured) rather than the exact same view as the lens; that would require an internal reflex mirror that bounces the image up to your eyeball. Does this mean much to anyone who is not in fact a professional photographer? Not really, but maybe you were wondering.
And this http://www.camerashop.nl/product/467945/sony-cybershot-dsc-rx100iii.html?utm_source=google&utm_medium=pla&utm_campaign=Digitale_camera%27s_compact&utm_content=Sony_Cybershot_DSC-RX100III&ref=266724&label=16354-AGI-18568526544-ASI-97290890904-467945&gclid=Cj0KEQjwl6GuBRD8x4G646HX7ZYBEiQADGnzurmnKUNqp_GCtZzhonSnn1_n96Xb5zfuDd2ol5Ub_Y4aAiUS8P8HAQ
It’s just been replaced by the EOS Rebel T7 / EOS 2000D (above), but that does mean that the EOS Rebel T6 (known as the EOS 1300D outside the US) should now be even cheaper. In many ways the specification is very similar to the newer camera, with the key difference being the Rebel T6 features a 18MP sensor, which compared to rivals, is starting to show its age against rivals with higher pixel counts. Canon’s just announced its replacement, the EOS Rebel T7 / EOS 2000D, so you might be able to track this down at an even more tempting price before it disappears for good. 
For a long time we’ve looked at mirrorless cameras and SLRs as two distinct classes. And while that distinction still has merit at the higher end of the spectrum, for entry-level photographers the lines are blurred.
Cherish received a BFA in Cinematography from the Academy of Art University. She has gone on to work as a freelance 1st camera assistant under award-winning directors of photography and continues to crew on high production films and commercials.
Meets are always indoor, with artificial light (90% of the time in gyms), videos are short, from 10-15 seconds for vault, to 90 seconds (floor). Target is in movement, but not crazy fast. Sound is important but since they don’t sing while performing is not crucial (maybe some occasional groaning). Budget… if under $500 better, but if another $100 will make a difference will make the effort.