camera effects | webcam camera

Digital cameras and camcorders take entirely different types of lenses. A camcorder lens will typically offer a far more robust zoom, giving you greater magnification. While there are a number of long zoom still cameras on the market, they still can’t touch the 30x or 60x lenses available on some camcorders.
The $600 Panasonic V770K is a complex camcorder and offers features that many users may not want or need. For those who want to be able to capture decent video without fuss (and for substantially less cash), they should look to the $300 Canon Vixia HF R600 or its predecessor the R500. It’s not quite on the same level as the Panasonic in any of sharpness, color, image stabilization, or low-light performance, but it’s simple to use, with a touchscreen interface that doesn’t overwhelm the user, as well as an impressive 32x optical zoom.
Sony’s Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 is a tiny vlogging powerhouse. Weighing in at just 10.5 ounces this camera is able to shoot 4K video at 30, 25, and 24 fps and at fps rates of up to 1,000. And it is small enough to fit in your pocket. This camera is a good option for vloggers who do a lot of their shooting away from the comfort of their own home and want a camera that is easy to take along for the ride.
DV (1995): Initially developed by Sony, the DV standard became the most widespread standard-definition digital camcorder technology for the next decade. The DV format was the first to make capturing footage for video editing possible without special hardware, using the 4- or 6-pin Firewire sockets common on computers at the time.[18]
The distance range in which objects appear clear and sharp, called depth of field, can be adjusted by many cameras. This allows for a photographer to control which objects appear in focus, and which do not.
There is a saying in photography that the best camera is the one that is with you and for many of us, a smartphone camera is it. The iPhone 6s and Samsung S5 are both able to shoot 4K video on their front camera, but that resolution drops significantly when you flip it around. What these phones lack in resolution and low light performance they make up for in being tiny, lightweight, and always on hand.
Sensor Size Full-Frame (24 x 36mm) mm Full-Frame (24 x 36mm) mm Full-Frame (35.9 x 23.9mm) APS-C (15.7 x 23.7mm) mm Full-Frame (35.9 x 24mm) APS-C (23.5 x 15.6mm) mm APS-C (22.3 x 14.9mm) APS-C (22.5 x 15mm) APS-C (23.2 x 15.4mm) mm APS-C (23.5 x 15.6mm) mm
Those Sonys you listed Vin p may weight less (and I’m sure they do just looking at them; smaller size) and other specs you listed but they don’t beat the Nikon 3300 in price. Just checked B & H Photo and the Nikon is listed at $369 and the Sony a6000 is listed at $548 and the a6300 is over $1000. A bit pricey IMO for someone just starting out. I have both a Nikon and a Sony mirrorless I know so either company makes a quality product.
At the high end you can go for a sensor that’s about 54 by 40mm in size, just about matching the 645 film size. We’ve reviewed one of these cameras so far—the insanely expensive Phase One XF 100MP. It offers Raw image capture at 100MP resolution, which is more than overkill for the vast majority of photographers.
I have a serious question. My daughter does gymnastics and I just started a Youtube Channel for her. Currently I am using a Nikon Coolpix L840 (borrowed). I want to buy a good camera, but this camera must autofocus quickly when im zooming in and out as when I record her she is mostly on floors far away. I also want it to have an external mic port. I was thinking of the Canon Rebel T6i , but I heard it is not a good option for the type of videos I am wanting to record if this is so what is the best option?
Overlooked factor is the angle camera shoots. You need that for selfies but makes forward shooting much more pleasant too. Here the Canon does poorly and I am thinking about switching from Canon to Panasonic because of that.
Weight. These suckers are heavy! Crop sensor DSLRs aren’t light and when you move into full frame cameras the weight goes up even more. We’re not talking about lugging around a pile of rocks but they’re heavy enough that you probably won’t want to carry one around all day.
The $600 Panasonic HC-V770K has the best video, audio, and stabilization quality out of all the cameras available. We like its clear, bright video in low light, and the audio quality from the built-in microphone (as well as the ability to connect an external microphone). In situations where other camcorders capture grainy video, the V770K’s video is still clean and sharp.
These slimline shooters pack zoom lenses, which set them apart from smartphones, but for the most part use dated CCD sensor technology, which limits image quality when shooting at high ISO settings and cuts the maximum video quality to 720p. But if you’re looking for a small camera to carry on vacation or nature walks, you still have a few inexpensive alternatives to a smartphone.
A wide range of film and plate formats have been used by cameras. In the early history plate sizes were often specific for the make and model of camera although there quickly developed some standardisation for the more popular cameras. The introduction of roll film drove the standardization process still further so that by the 1950s only a few standard roll films were in use. These included 120 film providing 8, 12 or 16 exposures, 220 film providing 16 or 24 exposures, 127 film providing 8 or 12 exposures (principally in Brownie cameras) and 135 (35 mm film) providing 12, 20 or 36 exposures – or up to 72 exposures in the half-frame format or in bulk cassettes for the Leica Camera range.
Highly appreciated to your professional review on the top DV camera,i have uploaded videos to Youtube via my cell phone, but I’m starting a separate channel for reviews and am looking for something half decent that’s under $200.
DVD recordable (1996): A variety of recordable optical disc standards were released by multiple manufacturers during the 1990s and 2000s, of which DVD-RAM was the first. The most common in camcorders was MiniDVD-R, which used recordable 8 cm discs holding 30 minutes of MPEG video.
Stick this camcorder in auto mode, and it will choose the best settings for capturing video well in many situations, including low-light shooting and fast-moving action. It’s also smaller and lighter than the Panasonic—a considerable plus for something that you will be carrying around all day.
Even though consumer DSLRs have built-in flashes as a rule, many photographers opt to use a more powerful external flash. These flashes emit more light and can often be repositioned so that you can use reflected light to illuminate a subject. Bouncing flash off of a ceiling to brighten a room is possible with a dedicated flash unit, but not with the ubiquitous DSLR pop-up flash. Depending on your needs for power, recycle time, and movement, a dedicated flash can cost anywhere from $150 to $500.
The couch in my living room is too far from the TV to really take advantage of UHD unless I kick the screen size up as high as 85″, so I’m focusing more on getting a 1080p TV, either 55″ or 60″. Is the newest Samsung model in 1080p still the best option to go with there? The J6300.
Once you cross the $1,000 price barrier, you’ve entered into a realm where you likely have a very good handle on whether you prefer an SLR or mirrorless camera. If you’re buying in this range, you need to take a serious look at the lenses and accessories available for each system, and weigh the pluses and minuses of different image sensor formats.
You may want a combination of these camera types, in order to have all eventualities covered. For instance, your smartphone can be ideal for handling photo opportunities that come up on the spur of the moment. On the other hand, if you’re on a safari in Africa taking a photo of a lion, you’ll be better off utilizing the zoom on a DSLR camera than moving in close enough to line up the shot with your smartphone.
Many people consider the Canon 70D to be the best DSLR for vloggers due to its long battery life (920 pictures before needing a recharge compared to DSLR average of 894 shots), rock-solid autofocus system, and user-friendly touchscreen. This camera supports full HD 1080p recording at speeds of 30, 24, and 25 fps and is a favorite of lifestyle, beauty, and travel vloggers who want fantastic image quality.
The first camera using digital electronics to capture and store images was developed by Kodak engineer Steven Sasson in 1975. He used a charge-coupled device (CCD) provided by Fairchild Semiconductor, which provided only 0.01 megapixels to capture images. Sasson combined the CCD device with movie camera parts to create a digital camera that saved black and white images onto a cassette tape.[43] The images were then read from the cassette and viewed on a TV monitor.[44] Later, cassette tapes were replaced by flash memory.
After exposure every photograph is taken through pinch rollers inside of the instant camera. Thereby the developer paste contained in the paper ‘sandwich’ distributes on the image. After a minute, the cover sheet just needs to be removed and one gets a single original positive image with a fixed format. With some systems it was also possible to create an instant image negative, from which then could be made copies in the photo lab. The ultimate development was the SX-70 system of Polaroid, in which a row of ten shots – engine driven – could be made without having to remove any cover sheets from the picture. There were instant cameras for a variety of formats, as well as cartridges with instant film for normal system cameras.
For example, f/8 at 8 ms (1/125 of a second) and f/5.6 at 4 ms (1/250 of a second) yield the same amount of light. The chosen combination affects the final result. The aperture and focal length of the lens determine the depth of field, which refers to the range of distances from the lens that will be in focus. A longer lens or a wider aperture will result in “shallow” depth of field (i.e., only a small plane of the image will be in sharp focus). This is often useful for isolating subjects from backgrounds as in individual portraits or macro photography.
As camera a lens technology developed and wide aperture lenses became more common, rangefinder cameras were introduced to make focusing more precise. Early rangefinders had two separate viewfinder windows, one of which is linked to the focusing mechanisms and moved right or left as the focusing ring is turned. The two separate images are brought together on a ground glass viewing screen. When vertical lines in the object being photographed meet exactly in the combined image, the object is in focus. A normal composition viewfinder is also provided. Later the viewfinder and rangefinder were combined. Many rangefinder cameras had interchangeable lenses, each lens requiring its own range- and viewfinder linkages.
For cine cameras, film 35 mm wide and perforated with sprocket holes was established as the standard format in the 1890s. It was used for nearly all film-based professional motion picture production. For amateur use, several smaller and therefore less expensive formats were introduced. 17.5 mm film, created by splitting 35 mm film, was one early amateur format, but 9.5 mm film, introduced in Europe in 1922, and 16 mm film, introduced in the US in 1923, soon became the standards for “home movies” in their respective hemispheres. In 1932, the even more economical 8 mm format was created by doubling the number of perforations in 16 mm film, then splitting it, usually after exposure and processing. The Super 8 format, still 8 mm wide but with smaller perforations to make room for substantially larger film frames, was introduced in 1965.
While early phones had Internet connectivity, working web browsers and email-programs, the phone menu offered no way of including a photo in an email or uploading it to a web site. Connecting cables or removable media that would enable the local transfer of pictures were also usually missing. Modern smartphones have almost unlimited connectivity and transfer options with photograph attachment features.
Camcorders are designed to give you everything you need to take amazing videos. This makes them lightweight, extremely portable, and perfect for people who want to focus strictly on videography and not photography.
These images and videos can take up a lot of storage space, so you’ll find nearly all point and shoot cameras have slots for memory cards to keep up with your photography demands. Common memory card types for newer point and shoot cameras are SD cards, and microSD cards. Older cameras, however, may use Memory Stick PRO Duo or Memory Stick Micro. Use an adapter to transfer your images to your computer, or use a photo printer with a SD card slot to start printing right away.
I grew up taking pictures and making videos, I went to film school, and I’ve kept on snapping away in the years after graduation, taking pictures for articles I’m writing, to record my travels, or to document the early years of my children’s lives. After decades of taking photos, I’ve now whittled my collection of digital cameras to just a few: I currently own a Nikon DSLR, a Canon bridge camera, a Nikon CoolPix compact point-and-shoot, and a bunch of older models, most of which are slowly being destroyed by my 4-year-old son. (Also, there’s the phone in my pocket, of course.) That doesn’t mean, though, that those are the only good ones out there.
The OM-D E-M10 Mark III is a great alternative to an entry-level DSLR. Some will criticise the smaller Micro Four Thirds sensor format (roughly half the area of APS-C) but the effect on image quality is minor and it means that the lenses are as compact and lightweight as the camera itself. Sporting a 5-axis image stabilization system, decent electronic viewfinder, an impressive 8.6fps burst shooting speed and 4K video, it’s no toy – the E-M10 Mark III is a properly powerful camera.
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Camera phones can share pictures almost instantly and automatically via a sharing infrastructure integrated with the carrier network. Early developers including Philippe Kahn envisioned a technology that would enable service providers to “collect a fee every time anyone snaps a photo”.[7] The resulting technologies, Multimedia Messaging Service and Sha-Mail, were developed parallel to and in competition to open Internet-based mobile communication provided by GPRS and later 3G networks.
The Flip Video was a series of tapeless camcorders introduced by Pure Digital Technologies in 2006. Slightly larger than a smartphone, the Flip Video was a basic camcorder with record, zoom, playback and browse buttons and a USB jack for uploading video. The original models recorded at a 640×480-pixel resolution; later models featured HD recording at 1280×720 pixels. The Mino was a smaller Flip Video, with the same features as the standard model. The Mino was the smallest of all camcorders, slightly wider than a MiniDV cassette and smaller than most smartphones on the market. In fact the Mino was small enough to fit inside the shell of a VHS cassette. Later HD models featured larger screens. In 2011, the Flip Video (more recently manufactured by Cisco) was discontinued.[14]
Similar in size to earlier ZS/TZ-series cameras, Panasonic however has managed to squeeze a much larger sensor into the ZS100 (TZ100 outside the US). This enables the pixels to be about 2.4x bigger than they are in models like the Lumix ZS70 / TZ90, and this helps the ZS100 produce much higher quality images. The zoom lens isn’t quite so extensive though, but you still get an electronic viewfinder that makes it easier to compose images in bright sunny conditions and in addition to 4K video recording, there’s Panasonic’s 4K Photo mode to help capture 8MP images of fleeting moments. It all adds up to be a powerful compact camera. Want even more zoom range? Panasonic’s just announced the Lumix ZS200 / TZ200 with a 15x optical zoom. Review coming very soon.
Since many people now own a smartphone, the real question is whether you need a digital camera as well. It’s very hard to see an argument for point-and-shoot compacts anymore: for social-media snaps, most of us can get by with our phones. For this website, I take a lot of macro photos—close-ups of circuits and mechanical parts—with my Ixus that I couldn’t possibly capture with the LG, so I won’t be jumping ship anytime soon.
As for getting better audio options for another camera—definitely a solid choice. You could quite happily do that either with a video camera or a DSLR—and then upgrade and mix and match to fit your needs.